factor

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Factor

A financial institution that buys a firm's accounts receivable and collects the accounts.

Factor

A third party that buys a firm's accounts receivable. If a firm is not confident in its ability to collect on its credit sales, it may sell the right to receive payment to the factor at a discount. The factor then assumes the credit risk associated with the accounts receivable. This provides the firm immediate access to working capital, which is important, especially if the firm has a cash flow problem. The price of factoring is determined by the creditworthiness of the firm's customer, not of the firm itself. It is also known as accounts receivable financing.

factor

A firm that purchases accounts receivable from another firm at a discount. The purchasing firm then attempts to collect the receivables.

factor

To sell accounts receivable to another party at a discount from face value. Thus, a firm in need of cash to pay down short-term debt may decide to factor its accounts receivable to another firm.

factor

  1. a firm that purchases TRADE DEBTS from client firms. See FACTORING.
  2. a firm that buys in bulk and performs a WHOLESALING function.
  3. an input (for example raw material, labour, capital) which is used to produce a good or provide a service.

factor

  1. 1a FACTOR INPUT that is used in production (see NATURAL RESOURCES, LABOUR, CAPITAL).
  2. a business that buys in bulk and performs a WHOLESALING function.
  3. a business that buys trade debts from client firms (at some agreed price below the nominal value of the debts) and then arranges to recover them for itself. See FACTOR MARKET, FACTORING.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results suggest that future research should analyse ethical (damage to the victim) and moral (guilt) values so as to confirm whether or not they are independent inhibiting factors.
This is undoubtedly important for the planning and implementation of more flexible crime prevention programmes in that they must recognise that inhibiting factors are not the same for all social groups.
On the surface, this seems to suggest the existence of inhibiting factors that apply only to the wine industry, but not to other SME-driven sectors.
Although at this stage it is hard to determine with statistical significance about the absence of known inhibiting factors due to the limited sample size, the following discussion helps highlight the discrepancy between the initial findings of this study with previous studies.
If the findings with regard to the factors identified as inhibiting BPM implementation in the wine industry can be best described as illustrative but preliminary, then the explanations provided for the absence of two known inhibiting factors from previous studies are largely educated guesses.