copyright

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Copyright

The right to distribute, copy, or change an original work for a limited period of time. A state grants copyright to the creator of the work, but the creator may assign or sell the right. During the time the copyright persists, one must (with some exceptions) receive permission from the owner to publish or distribute the copyrighted material. After a certain period of time, any person may distribute the work without permission. See also: Public domain.

copyright

the legal ownership by persons or businesses of certain kinds of material, in particular original literary, dramatic, musical and artistic work; sound recordings, films, broadcasts and cable programmes; the typographical arrangement or layout of a published edition; and computer programs. In the UK, the COPYRIGHT, DESIGNS AND PATENTS ACT 1988 gives legal rights to the creators of copyright material so that they can control the various ways in which their work may be exploited. Copyright protection is automatic and there is no registration or other formality The 1988 Act gives copyright owners protection against unauthorized copying of such material in most cases for a period of 50 years. If copyright is infringed, the copyright owner (or assignee or licensee) may seek an injunction through the courts preventing further abuses, with offenders liable to pay unlimited damages/ fines and prison sentences in extreme cases. See BRAND.

copyright

the ownership of the rights to a publication of a book, manual, newspaper, etc., giving legal entitlement and powers of redress against theft and unauthorized publication or copying. See INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT.

Copyright

The exclusive legal right to sell, reproduce, or publish a literary, musical, or artistic work.
References in periodicals archive ?
enjoyed had the infringer not engaged in unauthorized acts in violation
In the same way, an agreement may not give an exclusive licensee a right to sue infringers without the patent owner.
subsequently increased the ease with which an alleged infringer may now
A) no award for monetary damages (including actual damages, statutory damages, costs or attorney's fees) shall be made other than an order requiring the infringer to pay reasonable compensation for the use of the infringed work; provided, however, that where the infringement is performed without any purpose of direct or indirect commercial advantage, such as through the sale of copies or phonorecords of the infringed work, and the infringer ceases the infringement expeditiously after receiving notice of the claim for infringement, no award of monetary relief shall be made.
the procedures to identify alleged copyright infringers in cases, for example, where associations find material they own appearing on others' Web sites.
The notification must identify the other litigation to the patent infringers, and the notice must state the intent of the patent holder to enforce its rights against the infringer at the conclusion of the litigation.
And Justice Breyer's concurrence even suggests that an infringer who "knew about the patent and nothing more" does not willfully infringe the patent; rather, knowledge that the accused product actually infringes appears to be required.
Since the brand names used for the infringing products were different, it was not possible to take any legal action against the infringers for breaching the trademark relating to the name of the product.
It is easy to see why lawsuits against indirect infringers are becoming more popular.
In addition to making contempt proceedings more widely available, the panel majority also made it easier to hold a repeat infringer in contempt.
Armed with the letter, the accused infringer may, in good faith, continue making and selling his or her product.
The infringers will be approached and asked to remove the artwork.