industry

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Industry

The category describing a company's primary business activity. This category is usually determined by the largest portion of revenue.

Industry.

An industry is a subdivision of a market sector and includes companies producing the same or similar goods and services. These companies often compete with each other for customers and investors.

For example, within the consumer staples sector, companies that manufacture household appliances, such as dishwashers and refrigerators, are part of the same industry.

The fundamentals of any single company in an industry can be measured against the industry as a whole, revealing where the company stands in relation to its peers.

industry

a branch of commercial enterprise concerned with the output of related goods or services. For example, the beer/brewing industry might be defined as all those firms that produce bitter and mild ales, lagers, stouts and elders. However, beer production might be seen also as constituting part of a wider and bigger industry, the ‘alcoholic beverages industry'which includes the production of spirits and wines as well as beer. Thus, there are specification problems with respect to how widely or narrowly a particular industry is defined. Moreover, STANDARD INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATIONS typically group together products on the basis of their supply characteristics, such as the use of common raw materials and manufacturing processes. This may or may not coincide with how goods and services are grouped together to define MARKETS, which requires account to be taken also of how products are seen from the point of view of buyers (that is, their demand characteristics). Thus although men's and women's' shoes are produced using the same materials and manufacturing processes, and often by the same firms, they are not considered by buyers as close substitutes, and hence, from a MARKETING point of view, they must be treated as constituting separate markets. See STRUCTURE OF INDUSTRY.

industry

a group of related economic activities classified according to the type of good or service supplied. For example, the beer/brewing industry might be defined as all those firms that produce bitter and mild ales, lagers, stouts and ciders. However, beer production might be seen also as constituting part of a wider and bigger industry, the ‘alcoholic beverages industry’, which includes the production of spirits and wines as well as beer. Thus, there are specification problems with respect to how widely or narrowly a particular industry is defined. Moreover, INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATIONS typically group together products on the basis of their supply characteristics such as the use of common raw materials and manufacturing processes. This may or may not coincide with how goods and services are grouped together to define MARKETS, which requires account to be taken also of how products are seen from the point of view of buyers (that is, their demand characteristics). Thus, although men's and women's shoes are produced using the same materials and manufacturing processes, and often by the same firms, they are not considered by buyers as close substitutes, and hence, from a buyer's point of view, they must be treated as constituting separate markets.

Looked at dynamically, a typical industry will grow, reach maturity (see Fig. 158 (b) -PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE entry) and, in many cases, then decline (for example, the textile, coal and shipbuilding industries in the UK). See STRUCTURE OF INDUSTRY, CROSS-ELASTICITY OF DEMAND, MARKET STRUCTURE.

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The Fund for a while still loaned extensively to industrialized countries (nearly 50 percent in 1977 (4)), but for the past twenty years has lent exclusively to the same countries the World Bank serves.
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So why are the industrialized nations not taking the necessary steps to rein in prices?
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At a meeting held between Iranian Minister of Industries and Mines, Ali Akbar Mehrabian, and Turkish Minister of Housing, Nustafa Demir, the two sides reviewed ways of bilateral cooperation in three fields: standardized housing, industrialized housing and construction materials.
Summary: As part of the 11th economic and social plan 2007-2011 for the period of, the Industrial Land Agency (AFI) is planning the creation of 27 new industrial areas covering a total surface of about 394 hectares, these industrialized zones on sale are spread among the coastal cities and the inner land regions.
KUWAIT: Economies of developing countries are seen growing up to 5 percent in 2009, while industrialized countries will shrink due to the global financial crisis, the World Bank's chief economist said.