individualism

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Related to individualists: individualism, Collectivists

individualism

the philosophy that individuals have their own unique set of wants and interests, and that they should be given free rein to pursue them. Those promoting this philosophy therefore advocate the removal of laws and regulations governing how people should behave. In the economic and business spheres, they argue, regulation stifles entrepreneurial creativity and inhibits responsiveness to market forces; if people can be freed from regulation they will become more highly motivated to succeed, whilst markets will be able to function more effectively, leading to benefits to society at large. They tend to be critical of TRADE UNIONS since they believe that unions elevate group over individual interests, and place restrictions on both their members' and managers' freedom to behave as they wish. Critics of this philosophy argue, however, that interests are in fact often shared (for example between groups of employees), that power resources are unequal and hence that collective action is therefore often necessary, and that unbridled pursuit of individual goals can damage the interests of others. See COLLECTIVISM, DEREGULATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the dependent individualists, for example, who have a lower-than-average trust in banks, efforts need to be focused on forming and building relationships as opposed to developing products.
Some people are definitive individualists. They enjoy power and speed and show this in their choice of exclusive and outstanding car colors.
Individualists, on the other hand, are more concerned with self, and generally more willing to employ distributive means to satisfy their selfinterests.
"Individualists are having a tough time at his tournament," said Petkovic, "I'm satisfied that Xherdan is not an individualist at the moment, but a team player.
Still it is difficult to see how libertarians and defenders of free markets, freedom of trade, etc., can avoid being also individualists. This is especially true of those who stress the need for the protection of basic human rights in the Lockean individualist position.
Individualists don't murder others for not satisfying their whims; individualists seek to live and let live.
Following a chapter that briefly discusses the anarchists' intellectual heirs in modern anti-capitalist and Green politics, he presents chapters on Peter Kropotkin's thinking on revolution and mutual aid; the anti-statist libertarian English Individualists; the individualist anarchists; the development of communist anarchism among working class revolutionaries, British and European writers and activists involved with the Freedom group, and the Christian anarchists; and the ecological anarchism of Elisee Reclus and Patrick Geddes.
Individualists are motivated to work in their own best interest.
Instead they asserted the primacy of direct ownership, self-employment and equitable exchange; the very concerns of the late nineteenth-century individualists.
(4) The LPDL managed to attract anti-socialists from across the political spectrum, including Old Liberals, High Tories and various radical individualists.
Because they are less bound by group membership and more concerned with individual autonomy and independence, individualists work with people from diverse groups (Glaser-Segura & Anghel, 2002) and may engage more readily in volunteer work that benefits strangers.