individualism

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individualism

the philosophy that individuals have their own unique set of wants and interests, and that they should be given free rein to pursue them. Those promoting this philosophy therefore advocate the removal of laws and regulations governing how people should behave. In the economic and business spheres, they argue, regulation stifles entrepreneurial creativity and inhibits responsiveness to market forces; if people can be freed from regulation they will become more highly motivated to succeed, whilst markets will be able to function more effectively, leading to benefits to society at large. They tend to be critical of TRADE UNIONS since they believe that unions elevate group over individual interests, and place restrictions on both their members' and managers' freedom to behave as they wish. Critics of this philosophy argue, however, that interests are in fact often shared (for example between groups of employees), that power resources are unequal and hence that collective action is therefore often necessary, and that unbridled pursuit of individual goals can damage the interests of others. See COLLECTIVISM, DEREGULATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although both the clones behaved individualistically under the combined menace of salinity/sodicity.
Egyptians are individualistically driven, always inclined to place their personal desires above the nation's interests.
In this cultural context and in this specific post-conflict setting, an individualistically oriented clinical approach would have alienated the coauthor as intern from the individuals and families he was trying to reach.
As Daniel Payne writes, "the Orthodox tradition understands the human being ecclesially rather than individualistically." (153) As a consequence, the tradition has a problem with the idea of individual rights in the Western manner.
For instance, in a seminal study, Fiske (2002) showed that individualistically oriented people were more likely to "free-ride" in larger groups, whereas collectivists did not or hardly reacted to group size in their decision of whether to free-ride or not.
Also, because this medical school ranks among its country's most prestigious, selective institutions of higher education, its students may not be wholly representative of their peers elsewhere in Colombia; for instance, they may be more individualistically competitive, self-confident, and optimistic.
Eric Gordon, MD, for letting me read his article on Lyme's disease that he will hopefully send to the Townsend Letter so other practitioners can really begin to understand what it means to truly individualistically to treat patients with complex chronic diseases.
Therefore, by increasing the presence of futures without material scarcity, we may increase our self-reflection on how our profit, power, and individualistically driven society may be driving us toward a material scarcity rather than a seemingly material abundant economy.
In a multi-national context, there is often--and certainly in the climate change case--a superadditive aspect to the possible joint actions by the countries, in the sense that together they can (i) do more than the sum of their alternative individualistic policies, and (ii) generate a larger joint benefit than the sum of their benefits when acting individualistically.
Whether answers by individuals on behalf of households will represent the preferences of all the individuals in the household in the same way as if they had each been questioned individually and individualistically depends on such factors as respondents' knowledge of other household members' utility functions, whether respondents are altruistic and how households make collective consumption choices.
[i]f the serious writers of the Twenties had generally seen themselves as vanguard, advancing, individualistically, aesthetically, apolitically, under the banner of experimental arts, those of the Thirties often saw themselves as inert agents driven by "inevitable", "necessary" forces beyond their individuality, recurring collective homage ...
Thus, while the Court's clarification of the differences between these three substantive norms of fundamental justice is welcome, its holding that they should be applied individualistically is more difficult to accept.