individualism

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Related to individualistic: self-revelation

individualism

the philosophy that individuals have their own unique set of wants and interests, and that they should be given free rein to pursue them. Those promoting this philosophy therefore advocate the removal of laws and regulations governing how people should behave. In the economic and business spheres, they argue, regulation stifles entrepreneurial creativity and inhibits responsiveness to market forces; if people can be freed from regulation they will become more highly motivated to succeed, whilst markets will be able to function more effectively, leading to benefits to society at large. They tend to be critical of TRADE UNIONS since they believe that unions elevate group over individual interests, and place restrictions on both their members' and managers' freedom to behave as they wish. Critics of this philosophy argue, however, that interests are in fact often shared (for example between groups of employees), that power resources are unequal and hence that collective action is therefore often necessary, and that unbridled pursuit of individual goals can damage the interests of others. See COLLECTIVISM, DEREGULATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
As I explain below, the SCC's adoption of the individualistic approach has resulted in a broadening of the applicability of the overbreadth principle vis-a-vis the other principles.
The individualistic self is characterized as independent, autonomous, and agentic; the collective self, as interdependent, connected, and communal (Markus & Kitayama, 1991).
Although defining a country as either collectivistic or individualistic is common in the literature [26, 27], simply comparing different countries ignores the fact that a significant amount of country-specific variation in values exists.
The main difference between individualistic and collectivistic cultural orientations is that collectivists tend to be other-focused and concerned with maintaining connectedness, whereas individualists tend to be self-focused and concerned with separating the self from others (Oyserman et al., 2002).
"What you learn about leadership generally comes from the US and Europe, where the cultures are very individualistic.
"Rice theory might explain why East Asia is so much less individualistic than expected based on its wealth," Talhelm says.
Research has made a distinction between individualistic and collectivistic societies.
This select collection of stoneware pottery, all made in a quaint individualistic style, comes in various shades from icy light to subtle grey blues.
People with strong individualistic values emphasize autonomy, independence, and individual initiative (Hofstede 1980).
Most epidemiologists prefer an exclusive individualistic approach, although the importance of a multilevel causal approach is widely recognized (Diez-Roux 2002).
Inspired by the word and attitude derived from the Latin, "ad libitum" which means "be free" or "as you like'; young fashion-conscious spectacle wearers can choose and wear the "ad lib" frame in a more casual and individualistic manner, suiting their lifestyle and circumstances.