incumbrance


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incumbrance

Same as encumbrance. See encumber.
References in periodicals archive ?
a legal and binding consent to the incumbrance. She retains her entire
740, 745 (1938): "In determining who is entitled to surplus proceeds arising in a foreclosure sale, it is the general rule that all incumbrances on mortgaged premises inferior to the mortgage on which sale is based, must be paid in order of time in which they respectively become liens, except as some equitable right demands a different order of payment." See also Waybright v.
Within this policy framework, teachers who are themselves well educated or skilled, those who have a significant amount of education and professional training, are an un-needed and costly incumbrance. (3)
who are undeniably of the mixed blood" so as to "settle the status of a considerable majority of Indians beyond dispute, and, therefore, settle alike percentage of the difficulties and annoyances incident to the allotments and status of both Indians who have alienated and the purchasers." (50) These Indians, no longer seen as needing the government's protection, should be allowed to continue alienating and selling their lands without incumbrance.
Lady Gimcrack's rejection of his now fiscally worthless offer is swift: "No, Sir, I thank you; my settlement is without incumbrance" (5.6.36).
This difference in the species is no doubt imputable in no small degree to the greater quantity of bone in the Right Whale; his Venetian blinds alone sometimes weighing more than a ton; from this incumbrance the Sperm Whale is wholly free.
Jeremy Belknap had written, "Negro children were reckoned an incumbrance in a family; and when weaned, were given away like puppies" ("Queries" 200; withdrawn by Hawthorne).
So far are rank and station from excusing us from this obligation to pecuniary exactness, that they seem rather to bind it upon us the closer; for in the higher walks of life, the attention of the husband is often engrossed by what he owes his country; while the wife cannot show her patriotism better than by relieving her partner from the weight of domestic incumbrance, and acting as a faithful steward and intelligent agent in every affair which can be submitted to her management.
As a traveler in Europe, Hawthorne considered himself an outsider and so free to admire the aristocracy's "picturesque effect on society." Writing in Our Old Home about a quaint English chapel graveyard filled with generations of nobles, he declares that a "titled and landed aristocracy" is "an evil and an incumbrance" but only to the nation that must bear it.
If the land is subject to a mortgage or other incumbrance, details should be given, e.g.
During his incumbrance he has actually presided over a 30% increase in council taxes, always citing the same, old tired argument about deprivation, whilst failing to acknowledge it is not areas but people who are deprived and that means anyone, in any ward of the town.