Incumbent

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Incumbent

Any officer in a company, especially a large corporation. Incumbents include the CEO, managing director, and members of the board of directors. Corporations usually must provide an incumbency certificate, which lists the names and positions of the corporation's officers, on demand of any member of the public.
References in periodicals archive ?
With only two political parties -- the Congress and the BJP -- and no space for a third formation, incumbency will be a deciding factor in MP
"Though the election looks like it will go to the wire, the greater likelihood, based on cold-blooded analysis, is that experience, depth and state incumbency will triumph over youthfulness," said Eldred Masunungure, a professor of political science at the University of Zimbabwe.
"However," the report adds, "the advantages of incumbency at county level were evidently to the benefit of both political camps.
Incumbency refers to the difficulty in changing a system where the rules and structures are in the control of those who stand to benefit from them.
To help partners plan their growth and protect their investments, Dell EMC launched the LOB Incumbency for Storage programme in October 2016.
Locally, it illustrated the power of incumbency or, in open races, the edge conferred by local experience.
Bendigo and Adelaide Bank managing director, Mike Hirst, said, 'Banks and others in financial service industry who currently have incumbency do have that trust element working for them at the moment.'
"A string of presidents and congresses have shown their compassion for America's aged (and, incidentally, for their own incumbency) by creating an actuarially unfunded debt of $6 trillion, give or take a trillion.
If he seeks another term, Cochran will run with the advantages of incumbency, including name recognition and nearly $804,000 in campaign cash already on hand.
But the victor will enter the race next year with a key advantage: four months of incumbency.
The essays cover whether constitutions matter; divided government versus incumbency externality; incumbency, party identification, and governmental lead; when population thresholds can be trusted; and whether creditors discipline local governments.