ITS

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ITS

Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Intermarket Trading System

A computerized trading system allowing investors and brokers access to more than one stock exchange. That is, the ITS effectively lists securities of participating exchanges on each other's boards. This allows investors to find the best price available for securities. The Cincinnati Stock Exchange was the first major exchange to adopt the ITS. See also: NMS.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

ITS

Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The upcoming CES will feature the latest in-vehicle technologies that will soon be on store shelves, including advancements in portable GPS, location based services, in-car video, wireless technology and integrated products for combining entertainment with navigation and security.
They anticipate that the roadside cooperative system portion could be in place by the time auto manufacturers complete development and begin installation of the in-vehicle technologies that they are working on currently.
"There is a looming public safety crisis ahead with the future proliferation of these in-vehicle technologies," AAA President and CEO Robert Darbelnet said in a statement.
In September 2002, Transport Canada completed data collection on three in-vehicle technologies and one driver-worn device.
Lack of unbiased experts, a ponderous consensus process and the sheer scope of in-vehicle technologies continue to block the path.
In addition, the site contains papers, polls, comments, and Q&A items related to topics and issues associated with in-vehicle technologies, such as Measuring Distraction, Safety Campaigns, Regulations, and Design Features.
However, without a "human-centered" design approach for the intelligent vehicle that attempts to integrate and coordinate various technologies, we may not only lose the opportunity to realize the benefits offered by new in-vehicle technologies, but we could inadvertently degrade driving safety and performance.