ITS

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Related to in-vehicle systems: automobile systems, automotive systems

ITS

Intermarket Trading System

A computerized trading system allowing investors and brokers access to more than one stock exchange. That is, the ITS effectively lists securities of participating exchanges on each other's boards. This allows investors to find the best price available for securities. The Cincinnati Stock Exchange was the first major exchange to adopt the ITS. See also: NMS.

ITS

References in periodicals archive ?
Because of its limited screen size, only the most important information was presented to the driver on the smartphone, thus making the smartphone easier to use than the in-vehicle system and reducing driver distraction.
When the system was not used, the driver did not interact with the in-vehicle system and focused on driving the car.
While automakers retain a distinct advantage in controlling the direction of in-vehicle systems, they still rely heavily on alliance partners and after market suppliers.
In-vehicle systems will also affect the choices made while driving.
The benefits of our in-vehicle system, shown in France, have gained much attention in the global market.
The company has identified AI and connectivity as its next major revenue area and unveiled its vision to connect all the Samsung devices and even in-vehicle systems via its SmartThings app and Bixby voice assistant by 2020.
Gartner defines the connected car as an automobile that is capable of bidirectional wireless communication with an external network for the purpose of delivering digital content and services, transmitting telemetry data from the vehicle, enabling remote monitoring and control, or managing in-vehicle systems.
Qt is the platform of choice for in-vehicle systems, industrial automation devices and other business critical applications manufacturers.
in-vehicle systems. Over 15 billion processors using ARM cores shipped last
will form a joint venture to develop basic software (BSW) that can support high-speed data communication, high-quality security, and high-performance microcomputers, in order to advance in-vehicle systems used for automated driving and other control actions.
According to the study from the UNC Highway Safety Research Center young drivers were less likely to use cell phones and other technology (including in-vehicle systems, like the radio and temperature control) when there were passengers in the car with them.
Automotive applications are becoming more sophisticated as different in-vehicle systems are networked together to share information, monitor performance and enhance safety.