Order

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Order

Instruction to a broker/dealer to buy, sell, deliver, or receive securities or commodities that commits the issuer of the "order" to the terms specified. See: indication, inquiry, bid wanted, offer wanted.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Order

An instruction, especially to a broker, to buy, sell, or conduct some other transaction involving a security or commodity. For example, if a client wishes to buy 100 shares in AT&T, he/she makes an order to a broker to that effect. Orders may take a number of forms. A market order is an order to conduct a transaction at the current market price. A limit order is an order to conduct a transaction at a stated price or better. A stop order is an order to conduct a transaction at the best available price after a certain stated price is reached. Finally, a stop-limit order is a stop order that becomes a limit order when the stated price (known as the stop price) is reached.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

order

A customer's instructions to buy or sell securities.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
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