IR

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IR

The two-character ISO 3166 country code for IRAN, ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF.

IR

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for the Islamic Republic of Iran. This is the code used in international transactions to and from Iranian bank accounts.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for Iran. This is used as an international standard for shipping to Iran. Each province has its own code with the prefix "IR." For example, the code for the Province of Fars is ISO 3166-2:IR-14.
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The most common technique error that prompted a retake for both direct and PSP receptors was image receptor misplacement for bitewings and inadequate coverage of the apical area for periapical images.
For example, image receptor misplacement is a common cause of retakes that should be addressed by radiology instructors.
It should be impossible to expose the image receptor while the radiologic technologist is standing outside the fixed protective barrier of the operating console booth.
These devices are adjusted so that the collimator shutters automatically provide an x-ray beam equal to the image receptor with any film size and at all standard SIDs.
By selecting higher kVp, the operator increases the average beam energy of the x-rays (known as "beam hardening") and therefore increases the fraction of the entrance beam that passes through to the image receptor.
Studies have shown that procedures with a large air gap between the image intensifier and the patient in particular do not need the grid because the air gap allows for escape of a good portion of the scattered x-rays before interaction with the image receptor. (16)
The mammographer lifts the breast onto the image receptor, elevating the inframammary fold.
Gray et al[7] and Peterson et al[3] have reduced exposure using a faster image receptor and compensating filters.
of Manchester) and his co-authors (from the University Dental Hospital in Cardiff and the Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust) give practitioners a solid background in a range of new techniques and imagery sciences, giving a historical perspective, then covering intraoral x-ray equipment and imaging, panoramic equipment and imaging, conventional image receptors, digital imaging, direct digital imaging, indirect digital imaging, image sorting and handling, and implant imaging.
The digital imaging chapter begins with an interesting discussion regarding the common uses of charge-coupled devices (CCD's) as image receptors in a variety of applications such as fax machines, camcorders, intraoral video cameras, and panoramic radiographic equipment.
A quality control program was established for x-ray units, processors, image receptors, phantom image quality tests, annual medical physics surveys and monitoring of repeat mammograms.