Idle

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Idle

Describing a project or asset that is not being used and therefore is not generating revenue. An idle asset usually has a maintenance cost associated with it. Companies therefore attempt not to have idle assets unless demand drops below a certain level.
References in periodicals archive ?
It seems that people will opt for idleness when they're given no reason to be busy, though the choice also means they'll be less happy.
The benefits of idleness include contemplation, relaxation and reflection, which, in turn, decrease stress, increase idea generation, improve clarity and help resolve issues that may be bothering you.
the medieval] model of society appears to have lost much of its currency" (14): not only were the "fighters" doing little fighting, but the Reformation brought to the fore the idea that idleness was a sin, a rejection of God's commandment to postlapsarian man.
The series, entitled Industry and Idleness, follows Goodchild as he works at his loom, sings at church, marries his master's daughter, and becomes free to practise as a journeyman weaver.
Enforced idleness ruins lives and is an expensive waste of talent as the Treasury ends up paying out benefits instead of collecting taxes from wages.
The sheer pace of business in the Emirates, the acutely competitive nature of the work, the exhausting heat, and now the credit crunch, applying huge extra pressures of uncertainty, financial disruption and the daunting prospect of idleness.
You've been living a life of idleness - find yourself work and start behaving like an adult," Judge William Gaskell told Christopher Williams of Pennsylvania, Llanedeyrn, Cardiff.
For centuries the English language has been hard at work cataloguing the infinite variety of human idleness.
Studies have shown that obesity, idleness and too much sugary soda and fruit juice can increase risk of contracting the disease.
I'm worried that she's just a born skiver who's hoping I'll keep her in idleness.
1540) points out to Wit that he should be able to judge how much more worthy a companion she is than Idleness simply on the grounds of their names (p.