hypothetical condition

hypothetical condition

A condition that does not currently exist in fact but has some probability of existing in the future.An appraisal may determine the value of property in its current condition, and then also determine a value based on a hypothetical condition,such as a state's plans to build a new highway exit at the property.

References in periodicals archive ?
In this anarchic hypothetical condition, there is nothing but the clashes of human desires and wills, or, as the philosopher described it, 'the war of all against all.
Finally, when a particular term has definitions in different standards documents--SVP, IVS, USPAP, Yellow Book--all the available definitions are included and labeled with parenthetical references to the source as shown below for the definition of hypothetical condition.
The Comment to Standards Rule 1-2(g) states that a hypothetical condition may be used in an assignment only if use of the hypothetical condition is clearly required for legal purposes, or purposes of reasonable analysis or comparison.
Why would such a hypothetical condition appeal to a rational Humanist mind?
4) As reported above, the overall response rate was greater in the hypothetical condition than in the actual payment condition.
Some commentators have expressed the view that the phrasing amounts to a hypothetical condition and that the clause as a whole will apply only when the nonresident corporation is not a foreign affiliate.
Eliciting a patient's preference about a life-sustaining treatment or about the value of life under a hypothetical condition such as severe dementia) loses credibility when the investigator for physician) does not provide sufficient information to ensure an accurate understanding of whatever is being described.
The Comment to the definition of Hypothetical Condition in the 2014-2015 edition of USPAP states:
Revised definitions for client, extraordinary assumption and hypothetical condition, as well as the addition of exposure time to the definitions section.
When appraising a property known to have environmental issues as if "clean" or unimpaired, a hypothetical condition exists--specifically, a condition known not to be true but assumed to be true for the appraisal.
27) Both Rahn, and Dolman and Seymour describe a hypothetical condition (known to be untrue) or at least an extraordinary assumption (not known if it is true).
Sometimes an appraiser invalidates the "as is" premise by using a hypothetical condition or simply excluding an "as is" market value.