ARM

(redirected from humerus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to humerus: femur

ARM

ARM

GOST 7.67 Latin three-letter geocode for Armenia. The code is used for transactions to and from Armenian bank accounts and for international shipping to Armenia. As with all GOST 7.67 codes, it is used primarily in Cyrillic alphabets.

Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM).

An adjustable rate mortgage is a long-term loan you use to finance a real estate purchase, typically a home.

Unlike a fixed-rate mortgage, where the interest rate remains the same for the term of the loan, the interest rate on an ARM is adjusted, or changed, during its term.

The initial rate on an ARM is usually lower than the rate on a fixed-rate mortgage for the same term, which means it may be easier to qualify for an ARM. You take the risk, however, that interest rates may rise, increasing the cost of your mortgage. Of course, it's also possible that the rates may drop, decreasing your payments.

The rate adjustments, which are based on changes in one of the publicly reported indexes that reflect market rates, occur at preset times, usually once a year but sometimes less often. Typically, rate changes on ARMs are capped both annually and over the term of the loan, which helps protect you in the case of a rapid or sustained increase in market rates.

However, certain ARMs allow negative amortization, which means additional interest could accumulate on the outstanding balance if market rates rise higher than the cap. That interest would be due when the loan matured or if you want to prepay.

ARM

See adjustable-rate mortgage.

ARM

See Adjustable Rate Mortgage.

References in periodicals archive ?
Radial nerve palsy associated with fractures of the shaft of the humerus: a systematic review.
Each humerus was labeled in ink when it was processed in the laboratory after exhumation in 2015.
Anatomical study of diaphyseal nutrient foramina in human adult humerus. Arch Med & Health Sci 2014;2(2):165-9.
Two orthogonal view radiographs were taken of each humerus. Specimens were not included if evidence of osteolysis, fracture, or other boney imperfection was recognized.
We analyzed a large cohort of patients with proximal humerus fractures treated with locked plating by a single surgeon over the course of his "learning curve." Our null hypothesis was that there would be no change in complication rates and that a learning curve did not exist.
Supracondylar fracture of humerus is very difficult to accuratelly reduce without internal fixation2.
in 1997 [6] reported one 16-year-old patient with posterolateral instability, cubitus varus, and a history of distal humerus supracondylar fracture at the age of 5, which had shown no complications until he started playing volleyball with more elbow demand.
A biopsy of the humeral lesions seen on MRI revealed non-caseating granulomatous inflammation, confirming osseous sarcoid of the humerus (Figure 3).
Proximal humerus reconstruction after tumour resection: Biological versus endoprosthetic reconstruction.
This is the first study on pediatric humerus supracondylar fractures in the Puerto Rican population.
Implant fixation in the osteoporotic proximal humerus is remarkably challenging for surgeons [50-52].