bond

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Bond

Bonds are debt and are issued for a period of more than one year. The US government, local governments, water districts, companies and many other types of institutions sell bonds. When an investor buys bonds, he or she is lending money. The seller of the bond agrees to repay the principal amount of the loan at a specified time. Interest-bearing bonds pay interest periodically.

Bond

A security representing the debt of the company or government issuing it. When a company or government issues a bond, it borrows money from the bondholders; it then uses the money to invest in its operations. In exchange, the bondholder receives the principal amount back on a maturity date stated in the indenture, which is the agreement governing a bond's terms. In addition, the bondholder usually has the right to receive coupons or payments on the bond's interest. Generally speaking, a bond is tradable though some, such as savings bonds, are not. The interest rates on Treasury securities are considered a benchmark for interest rates on other debt in the United States. The higher the interest rate on a bond is, the more risky it is likely to be.

There are several different kinds of bonds. The most basic division is the one between corporate bonds, which are issued by private companies, and government bonds such as Treasuries or municipal bonds. Other common types include callable bonds, which allow the issuer to repay the principal prior to maturity, depriving the bondholder of future coupons, and floating rate notes, which carry an interest rate that changes from time to time according to some benchmark. Along with cash and stocks, bonds are one of the basic types of assets.

bond

1. A long-term promissory note. Bonds vary widely in maturity, security, and type of issuer, although most are sold in $1,000 denominations or, if a municipal bond, $5,000 denominations.
2. A written obligation that makes a person or an institution responsible for the actions of another.

Bond.

Bonds are debt securities issued by corporations and governments.

Bonds are, in fact, loans that you and other investors make to the issuers in return for the promise of being paid interest, usually but not always at a fixed rate, over the loan term. The issuer also promises to repay the loan principal at maturity, on time and in full.

Because most bonds pay interest on a regular basis, they are also described as fixed-income investments. While the term bond is used generically to describe all debt securities, bonds are specifically long-term investments, with maturities longer than ten years.

bond

a FINANCIAL SECURITY issued by a company or by the government as a means of borrowing long-term funds. Bonds are, typically issued for a set number of years (often 10 years plus), being repayable on maturity. They are issued in units of a fixed (nominal) face value and bear a fixed (nominal) rate of interest. Purchasers of bonds include private individuals, commercial banks and institutional investors (pension funds, etc.) who hold them as a form of portfolio investment.

Once issued, bonds can be bought and sold on the STOCK MARKET. Bond prices tend to fluctuate at prices below their face value, reflecting buying and selling strengths, but are closely linked to prevailing market interest rates so as to remain attractive to potential buyers. For example, a £100 bond with a nominal 5% interest rate returning £5 per year would have to be priced at £50 if current market interest rates were 10% so that a buyer could earn an effective return of £5/£50 = 10% on his investment.

In addition to their role as a means of borrowing money, the sale and purchase of bonds is used by the monetary authorities to control the MONEY SUPPLY. See MONETARY POLICY. See also EUROCURRENCY MARKET, GILT-EDGED SECURITY.

bond

a FINANCIAL SECURITY issued by businesses and by the government as a means of BORROWING long-term funds. Bonds are typically issued for periods of several years; they are repayable on maturity and bear a fixed NOMINAL (COUPON) INTEREST RATE. Once a bond has been issued at its nominal value, then the market price at which it is sold subsequently will vary in order to keep the EFFECTIVE INTEREST RATE on the bond in line with current prevailing interest rates. For example, a £100 bond with a nominal 5% interest rate paying £5 per year would have to be priced at £50 if current market interest rates were 10%, so that a buyer could earn an effective return of £5/50 = 10% on his investment.

In addition to their role as a means of borrowing money, government bonds are used by the monetary authorities as a means of regulating the MONEY SUPPLY. For example, if the authorities wish to reduce the money supply, they can issue bonds to the general public, thereby reducing the liquidity of the banking system as customers draw cheques to pay for these bonds. See also OPEN MARKET OPERATION, BANK DEPOSIT CREATION, PUBLIC SECTOR BORROWING REQUIREMENT, SPECULATIVE DEMAND FOR MONEY, CONSOLS.

bond

A certificate that provides evidence of a debt or obligation.

Bond

A note obliging a corporation or governmental unit to repay, on a specified date, money loaned to it by the bondholder. The holder receives interest for the life of the bond. If a bond is backed by collateral, it is called a mortgage bond. If it is backed only by the good faith and credit rating of the issuing company, it is called a debenture.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this paper, we restrict our attention to older adults with all the particular needs and challenges associated with that period of life, and the particular prospects of the human-animal bond for facilitating positive adjustments and outcomes.
Worldwide, research into the importance of the human-animal bond includes the role of service animals, the human health benefits of companion animal ownership, and the health benefits of interacting with visiting companion animals.
In order to provide such support, it is important for mental health counselors to have a strong foundation in grief theory as well as possess knowledge of the importance of the human-animal bond. Such a foundation can give mental health counselors insight into a clients' social support network, coping skills, and previous grief responses.
The references cited in this section and throughout this article, along with the videos, websites, and intervention models listed in the Appendix, can be used to introduce students to the human-animal bond and to the link between animal cruelty and interpersonal violence.
"Our goal is to protect pets and to strengthen the human-animal bond that is so meaningful for pet owners."
The articles include: (1) "Sexual Harassment on Campus: Does Having a Policy Help?" (Sue Spooner); (2) "It's a Dog's Life: A Pilot Study Investigating the Effects of the Human-Animal Bond on a Child with Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder" (Jennifer Lieber and Elizabeth Fassig); (3) "Seasons Change and So Do I" (John F.
Notable pet education programs include the workbook by Madeleine Antonelli et al., Pets and Me (Philadelphia: Center for School Study Councils, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education, 1991); and Sherry Vaughan et al., Learning and Living Together: Building the Human-Animal Bond, rev.
Intervention is based upon the idea that the human-animal bond can be utilized as an integrated holistic approach to the care and rehabilitation of individuals and their families with chronic illnesses and disabilities.
Responsibility is inherent in the human-animal bond. Careful attention to animal species, breed and temeprament during selection of a pet, as well as training, nutrition, sanitation and proper veterinary care, is essential to proper bonding.
Our programs help keep pets in their homes while protecting and promoting the human-animal bond that is so physically and psychologically valuable to our clients.
"With human-animal interaction research more clearly documenting the impact of the human-animal bond on mental and physical health, it is important to support research on how companion animals can benefit vulnerable and at-risk populations," said Bob Vetere, HABRI President and Chair of the Board of Trustees.
Beck, who heads the Center for the Human-Animal Bond at Purdue, urges people to carefully consider the implications.

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