Housewife

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Housewife

A woman who stays home while her husband works to earn a living. Housewives generally are responsible for cooking, cleaning and child-rearing. For that reason, they form a strong demographic for products related to these activities. Housewives are less common today as women have gradually entered the workforce and more households have two breadwinners. See also: Housewife time.
References in periodicals archive ?
(21) Roy Porter, Disease, Medicine, and Society in England, 1550-1860 (London; Macmillan, 1986): "skills in homemade medicines formed as much a part of good housewifery for a lady as making her own soap, beer, and preserves out of the produce of the kitchen garden, woods, and hedgerows" (14).
Even the alternative "helping" arrangement Hawthorne champions in his characterization of Phoebe's airy housewifery is not free from the shadow of feudalism.
"Housewifery and Motherhood: The Question of Role Change in the Progressive Era." In Woman's Being, Woman's Place: Female Identity and Vocation in American History, edited by Mary Kelley, 142-153.
In chapter seven, Tutuncu discusses, as described in the title, "Islamist Intellectuals and Women in Turkey", and she compares and contrasts the discourse of a "group of Islamist women" on women and feminism, which she describes as a "culturalist patriarchal Islamist discourse" (as represented by Ali Bulac, an acclaimed Muslim intellectual), and "instrumentalist Islamist discourse" (as nurtured by various religiously inclined people), and then proceeds to discuss the strength and limits of an Islamist women's discourse on "femininity, housewifery, patriarchy, justice, and equality" (p.
(102) They improved the patients' diet and provided 'a comfortable day room with wireless', a library and classes in housewifery, cooking, needlework and dress-making.
"Like the empty plains of Kansas that tempted the restless immigrant," she argued, "the suburbs in their very newness and lack of structured service, offered, at least at first, a limitless challenge to the energy of educated American women." But once those pioneers helped establish the new communities, subsequent settlers "were perfectly willing to accept the suburban community as they found it (their only problem was 'how to fit in'); they were perfectly willing to fill their days with the trivia of housewifery." Men began to fill the most important volunteer jobs, and housework expanded "to fill the time available."
MARTIN, Placage and the Louisiana Gens de Couleur Libre, in CREOLE: THE HISTORY AND LEGACY OF LOUISIANA'S FREE PEOPLE OF COLOR 61-60 (Sybil Kien ed., 2000) ("White women were not only few in number, but also were frequently former inmates of asylums and houses of correction in France who had been brought to the frontier territory by force; they were typically described by many of the men as 'ugly, ignorant, irascible, and promiscuous.' The other white women said to have been available to European men are the famed 'casket girls.' Reputed to be from middle class families and chosen for their 'skill in housewifery duties' and 'excellence of character,' they are reported to have reached New Orleans in 1728, with others arriving in intervals, until 1751.").
In contrast with orthodox marxist theory, the communist (male) press exalted housewifery and did not present paid work as a means of emancipation at all.
Tecwyn Evans, Llanrwst Nid wyf yn ysgolhaig o bell ffordd, ond yn l geiriadur J Bodvan Anwyl mae'r gair hwswaeth yn golygu 'housewifery' neu 'domestic economy'.
Encoded in these kitschy vintage aprons, contemporary craftwork can be seen as a site of "postfemininity": a liminal space of pre- and postfeminist desires and choices that can no longer be conceptualized as "a split between feminism and housewifery, agency and victimization, work and family life." (68) Feminist scholar Stephanie Genz argues that postfemininity constitutes neither a radical break from "old-fashioned'" philocentric femininity nor complete continuity but, rather, something much more ambiguous and hard to pin down.
Suburban families had many of "their advantages paid for by minorities and the lower classes" (73), and "women's retreat to housewifery ...
The president herself claimed that the League had professionalized housewifery and that the awakening of women's economic importance affected the entire world of commerce due to the changes in relationships among husbands and wives, as well as wives and industry (Heath 20).