homeworking

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homeworking

work performed at home for an organization or individual. Such work is usually performed by those confined to the home for some reason (for example child-care commitments) and usually involves simple assembly or packaging and dispatch, though there are more sophisticated variants (see NETWORKING). It is commonly found in the clothing industry, either for simple manufacture at the bottom-end of the market, or for creation of one-off fashion design at the top end. Payment is usually based on output, and rates of pay are often very low. Since homeworkers are usually freelance, not employees, they receive little employment or earnings protection and do not contribute directly to the social INSURANCE system. For this reason homeworking can be advantageous to those business people who place a premium on minimizing labour costs as part of a policy of competing on prices. Labour costs may be kept at a level which makes it not financially worthwhile to automate the production process on the employer's premises. A recurrent problem, however, is a high drop-out rate amongst homeworkers (see LABOUR TURNOVER). Once they are no longer confined to the home conventional employment may be more financially and socially rewarding.
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And that has been identified as a major problem in making homework effective,' she added.
As opponents of the homework ban have pointed out, homework has its uses, and totally prohibiting it needs careful consideration.
On the contrary, developmentally appropriate homework plays a critical role in the formation of positive learning beliefs and behaviors, including a belief in one's academic ability, a deliberative and effortful approach to mastery, and higher expectations and aspirations for one's future.
Alarmingly, 23 per cent of children said a parent or guardian had completed their homework for them, and 54 per cent said they shouldn't be assigned homework at all.
Recent studies have analyzed parental homework involvement through students' reports, and they argue that students' perceptions are more related to their own behavior than their parents' reports (see Moroni et al., 2015).
"Secondly, family time is incredibly important and should be protected without the kids having to come home after a very full day of studying and launch into more of the same." He added: "Homework should never supersede things that really matter, such as exercise, sleep and social interactions which are vital for students' cognitive, physical and emotional development.
Although the students won't have daily homework per se, they will eventually be given occasional science project or research assignment to complete at home.
But it is the school's policy toward homework that sets it apart.
"Most of what homework is doing," says literacy expert Harvey Daniels, "is driving kids away from learning."
It is an open question whether homework has any causative link to academic achievement, but we need to think about the quality of the homework tasks we ask pupils to do.
So, I had mixed feelings when I read about a top UK school considering a ban on homework because pupils are becoming depressed.