Housewife

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Housewife

A woman who stays home while her husband works to earn a living. Housewives generally are responsible for cooking, cleaning and child-rearing. For that reason, they form a strong demographic for products related to these activities. Housewives are less common today as women have gradually entered the workforce and more households have two breadwinners. See also: Housewife time.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Gap Ridge Homemaker Centre has attracted interest from major national bulky goods retailers looking to expand into the Pilbara," he said.
SHANNON HAYES: Yes, I see Radical Homemakers as part of deepening understanding of the values of feminism.
Talking about the contribution of homemakers to the society, justice Ganguly referred to a research that had estimated the value of household work performed by women in India at $ 612.
Caption(s): Homemaker has also made changes to its Web site with the goal of making it more "user-friendly," according to the company.
HomeMaker provides a wide selection of internal specifications, ensuring that a property becomes a home from the moment of moving in.
Hypothesis 1: Homemaker NEs will have less education than non-homemaker NEs.
This literature review briefly traces the rate of homemaker closure among blind and visually impaired VR clients during the last several decades.
Should Holly Homemaker be entitled to spousal support?
The benefit to senior housing providers should also be clear; rather than seeing homemaker companion care as a straight competitor for their business, the most proactive providers understand the advantages of forming strategic alliances, with such advantages:
Claudia graduated from Hollywood High School and worked as a messenger and in the legal department for RKO Pictures, and later as a homemaker.
Among these specialized home and community-based services that are important to persons with disabilities and their informal caregivers are homemaker services, personal care, various types of respite care, home-delivered meals, and companion services (Skinner & Jordan, 1989; Caserta, et al.
On summer visits to my grandmother Ruszkowski I picked |fruit~ and learned about preserving"--does a lot to warm up the public image of the omnicompetent homemaker The New York Times called "the over-achiever's Vita Sackville-West.