Housewife

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Housewife

A woman who stays home while her husband works to earn a living. Housewives generally are responsible for cooking, cleaning and child-rearing. For that reason, they form a strong demographic for products related to these activities. Housewives are less common today as women have gradually entered the workforce and more households have two breadwinners. See also: Housewife time.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Mumbai/Kanpur (Maharashtra/Uttar Pradesh) [India], Jan 30 (ANI): With the interim budget to be presented on February 1, different sections of society including homemakers, traders, wholesalers and jewellers have posed great expectations on the government.
Sim said 2.8 million women made up the country's homemakers, based on a parliamentary reply he received on March 21 last year.
The homemaker in this case was paid $65 a month by Ms.
Nearly half of the participants in the study that comprises Radical Homemakers were men.
Despite rationing and shortages, American homemakers prided themselves on providing nutritious, balanced meals for their families.
"Not relying on oil is becoming increasingly important as is addressing the problems of overflowing landfills," said Jeff Vaughn, senior vice president of sales and marketing at Homemaker. "Ingeo-based Natureworks rugs address both of these pressing issues."
The greatest discrepancy between family and participant reports on professional roles involved the category of homemaker. Of the 24 participants categorized by the family as homemakers, only 21% (5) of those participants agreed.
After her kids left the nest in 1999, homemaker Ellyn Anne Geisel decided to do "something different." Her project started as Apron Chronicles, a traveling museum exhibit about the history of "the icon of the homemaker," she said.
Harry was so supportive of her involvement in Homemaker's projects, that he often drove a carload of women to the local meeting or district convention over the years.
To help make that search easier, Fairclough Homes has improved its fantastic Homemaker scheme so that homebuyers can specify all those extra finishing touches before moving in.
Department of Labor (DOL) statistics which present similar findings about women moving into the working world as stated above, Burton, Dittmer, and Loveless (1992) point out that the statistics create inaccurate perceptions about mothers and working-not because the statistics are incorrect, but because many mothers called "working mothers" by the DOL consider themselves to be "at home." Recognizing that the majority of homemakers are still women and that there is little research in our specific area of study, literature that examines women's career issues is relevant to understanding some of the challenges of homemaker entrepreneurs.