Hold

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Hold

To maintain ownership of a security over a long period of time. "Hold" is also a recommendation of an analyst who is not positive enough on a stock to recommend a buy, but not negative enough on the stock to recommend a sell.

Hold

1. To not sell. That is, to continue to own a security. See also: Buy-and-hold strategy.

2. A recommendation by an analyst to neither buy nor sell a security. An analyst makes a hold recommendation when technical and/or fundamental indicators show middling performance by a security. It is also called a neutral or market perform recommendation.

Hold.

A securities analyst's recommendation to hold appears to take a middle ground between encouraging investors to buy and suggesting that they sell.

However, in an environment where an analyst makes very few sell recommendations, you may interpret that person's hold as an indication that it is time to sell.

Hold is also half of the investment strategy known as buy-and-hold. In this context, it means to keep a security in your portfolio over an extended period, perhaps ten years or more.

The logic is that if you purchase an investment with long-term potential and keep it through short-term ups and downs in the marketplace, you increase the potential for building portfolio value.

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It was a wonderful celebration of a rich culture, all the values that Club Bulakeno holds dear, and the lives of two women at the forefront of making Bulacan a better place.
He said he will focus on good governance and transparency which he holds dear."
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Memorabilia that Joseph's family still holds dear include field telegrams and a postcard to Miss J Belcher in Gillott Road, Edgbaston, which acknowledges his receipt of a family letter and letters that he sent home.
But Director General of the Law Society Ken Murphy insisted: "The conduct of Thomas Byrne is a direct affront to every value that the solicitors' profession holds dear. We view his crimes as disgraceful and abhorrent."