hit

(redirected from hit the trail)
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Hit

A unit measuring a person or IP address visiting a website. In general, the more hits a website generates, the higher revenue it earns from advertising and other sources.

hit

1. To sell a security at a bid price quoted by a dealer. For example, a trader will hit a bid.
2. To lose money on a trade. For example, a dealer may take a hit on the holdings of Moore's Fried Foods' common stock.
References in periodicals archive ?
The MP behind a new Bill to improve public access to the countryside dropped in on a Warwickshire landowner as he hit the trail to gather support.
Now, before late-spring wildflowers wither in the blazing summer heat, is a good time to hit the trail.
AFTER exams are over, 150,000 students hope to hit the trail on their gap years ...
And he hopes thousands more will hit the trail to north Wales when he takes on the world record at a later date.
Carluke trainer Ian Semple has hit the trail for the London stockbroker-belt track with a gilt-edged chance of pocketing a major prize.
CALAMITY Strain dusted herself down, put on her best cowgirl outfit and hit the trail for the US yesterday.
Armed with only that knowledge, I hit the trail with Ridgely the Outsider Dog in search of some climbing challenges this spring as I attempted to get into primo hiking shape.
Other Scots who have hit the trail to Oz include Stuart Munro, who was McPherson's manager at Carlton.
But when the 39 year-old Oscar winner hit the trail in Africa she discovered she'd bitten off more than she could chew.
In my zest to get started after the long drive from Eugene, I threw on my backpack and hit the trail. My backpack is equipped with its own water bladder, so that, along with a bottle of Gatorade, should have been enough to keep us hydrated through eight hours of hiking.
A century later, the Spiders hit the trail again today against Berwick.
Stone and a handful of his students hit the trail with tripods in hand, and eyes focused on details - images that slip past us, in my opinion, far too often.