hit

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Related to hit the road: Idioms

Hit

A unit measuring a person or IP address visiting a website. In general, the more hits a website generates, the higher revenue it earns from advertising and other sources.

hit

1. To sell a security at a bid price quoted by a dealer. For example, a trader will hit a bid.
2. To lose money on a trade. For example, a dealer may take a hit on the holdings of Moore's Fried Foods' common stock.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Millie" is projected to hit the road next summer with a cast of 22-24.
Cain and Charity hit the road Certainly Ross, who lays into Charity as she says her goodbyes to Moses.
Describing themselves as "the bad boys of abridgement", the RSC hit the road with the show following a successful Edinburgh Festival Fringe residency last summer.
"After a long and harsh winter, more Americans are pledging to hit the road this summer," said Claire Bennett, Executive Vice President at American Express Travel.
HIT THE ROAD: Two week's B&B is pounds 1,175 excluding flights.
TELLY host Ben Fogle is fronting a scheme to urge budding adventurers to hit the road and learn about the environment.
We hit the road at about 9 or 10:00pm for our next destination city, Madison, WI.
"Chica lit" gets a welcome new entry with this story of four women friends, gay and straight, who hit the road for a women's conference and arrive at insight instead.
When the fifth wheel on the Patriot missile system's tractor and the M860 trailer kingpin get in bad shape, you can't hook them up to hit the road. If they get in too bad a shape, you think the truck and trailer are locked together, but they're not.
Well before the date you're planning to hit the road, let your parents know your relatives' fighting bothers you.
NEWTOWN will be happy to hit the road again as they bid to rekindle their FAW Premier Cup prospects in today's trip to Port Talbot.
Lawrence (of Arabia); Kennedy isn't simply the first political Elvis--he's also a real-life Dean Moriarty (thus enabling the humorous chapter title "Hit the Road, Jack") and Andy Warhol with better hair.