hire

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Hire

To initiate employment for a person. That is, one hires an employee when one asks him/her to accept a job and he/she agrees. The employer agrees to pay wages and/or salary to the employee, who agrees to perform certain services for the employer. See also: Fire.

hire

the use by individuals or businesses of an ASSET that is leased to them by the owner of the asset in return for a financial payment (the hire charge). Hiring provides a means for consumers or firms to make use of assets without having to make large cash payments to purchase them. See LEASING.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the time, they were struggling to hire good producers and admitted their hiring process was not effective.
At the same time, the hiring forecast as shown in our Middle East Job Index Survey shows that many UAE employers are looking to hire in the short and long term and at so many different career levels."
Chairman David Wallis said in a statement that major customers continued to report strong order books "and the outlook for the hire market remains positive".
Larry Lobert, assistant superintendent for human resources for Grosse Pointe Public Schools in Mich., also uses General ASR His district typically hires between 30 and 50 teachers a year from as many as 3,000 applicants.
An attorney generally should not hire the client's existing CPA; doing so can make it difficult to establish the practitioner has advised in the context of litigation rather than business.
Internships can provide summer hires with a vast amount of experience they can use to springboard into future careers.
These executives have no desire to exert the effort needed to be progressive or innovative; they hire subordinates who lack progressive ideas or any desire to innovate so they won't be challenged by them (a growing crisis that has eroded successive layers of industry capability).
The fact is almost anyone can make a good first impression; but when you hire you are looking for a long-term employee, not someone who can put on a good act for an hour.
The majority of new hires had baccalaureate degrees in accounting; a few had law or masters' degrees.
We are pursuing new, hires even more aggressively than before," said Bruce Weissberg, president of DG Hart.
Today's fierce competitive climate demands that law enforcement agencies move quickly to identify and hire qualified applicants in the shortest time possible.