hire

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Hire

To initiate employment for a person. That is, one hires an employee when one asks him/her to accept a job and he/she agrees. The employer agrees to pay wages and/or salary to the employee, who agrees to perform certain services for the employer. See also: Fire.

hire

the use by individuals or businesses of an ASSET that is leased to them by the owner of the asset in return for a financial payment (the hire charge). Hiring provides a means for consumers or firms to make use of assets without having to make large cash payments to purchase them. See LEASING.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nearly seven in ten respondents believed some faces are more hirable than others.
Schools could propose to firms that they accept only those students who are deemed hirable in a job interview for the internship.
Presented below is a list of possible measures you could take to help ensure your Facebook content doesn't make you less hirable.
Students in the program begin their year by developing a comprehensive understanding of the artistic and technical pillars that will make a well-rounded, hirable artist.
In a study published May 28 in PLOS ONE, Rindy Anderson of Duke University and colleagues suggest that most people prefer a voice without vocal fry, rating it more attractive, better educated and more hirable, with women's ratings penalized more for fry than those of men.
Licensure requirements can limit the pool of hirable candidates, thus creating, once again, a supply-and-demand situation.
veil sometime called Purdon or hirable; mixing up males) and societal values such as concept of women honor to be at home or internalization of women has become the bases of gender discrimination and some how encourage the male to dominate or pressurize women to play role as their husband father and brothers want.
The results of Experiment 1 indicate that, consistent with the literature (and the majority of the study's hypotheses), the volunteer applicant who exhibited depressed behaviors was less likely to be hired, rated as less hirable and less appropriate for social tasks, held in lower esteem, and held at a greater social distance than the applicant who did not exhibit depressed behaviors.