hierarchy

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Hierarchy

In human relations, governance in which who is in power over whom is clearly defined. For example, a hierarchy may exist with a company owner and three employees in that the owner is in charge of the employees. Hierarchy is easy to understand; power structures are marked and followed. It may be contrasted with a heterarchy, but one may exist within the other.

hierarchy

  1. any pattern of social relationships where some individuals have AUTHORITY over others.
  2. the vertical structure of an ORGANIZATION. Generally there will be a number of management levels in the hierarchy with each having authority over the one beneath it. In a very small organization there might be only two levels in the hierarchy – the manager and the managed. In larger organizations the number will be greater, though it is rarely above eight. Organizations with a high number of levels are said to be tall whilst those with only two or three are said to be flat. There is an inverse relationship with the SPAN OF CONTROL. Where the latter is high, i.e. each manager supervises a large number of subordinates, there will be a tendency towards a flat structure. For the same number of total staff, a low span of control will be associated with a tall structure. See ORGANIZATION CHART, DE-LAYERING.

hierarchy

the ORGANIZATION of economic activities within the FIRM. The internal hierarchy of management levels within the firm can, under certain circumstances, take responsibility for economic transactions rather than conduct them at arm's length through external MARKET relationships. See INTERNALIZATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
This representational strategy embeds a subtle yet compelling gender politics that problematizes social conventions of normalcy, disrupts the homogeneity of cultural normative, and ultimately legitimizes an alternative (self)representation of identity that is not confined by the hierarchized binary oppositions of self/other, man/woman, normal/abnormal.
For each relationship, the author explores how hierarchized thinking about who is controlling whom gives way, on stage, to more complex representations of power and social critique.
At the same time, we think that the students hierarchized the dance styles known and preferred by them in a normal way, by having in view the large popularization of these styles in the latest years.
The author regards both the Indian penal code and Thomas's Minute on Indian Education as indicative of Macaulay's worldview: "Evangelical notions of a universal human family hierarchized in relation to stadial theory, together with assumptions about imperial responsibility to those unable to govern themselves, were firmly imprinted on Tom's mind" (201).
He was particularly disappointed in society's power struggles, which he saw were based on mutual aggression and hierarchized consciousness.
As an objectified entity, the human form threatens both the ideal of progress and a society that imagines the body in terms of a hierarchized organic metaphor that speaks to Foucault's notions of biopolitical control.
During this process of differentiation, a further paradox appears: social classes are hierarchized as they are inscribed into space--this tendency is increasing rather than, as is often claimed, diminishing.
The link between sensory organisation and the [cultural and social] Order is also the basis on which senses are hierarchized into 'higher' and 'lower' ones.
Acheson begins chapter two, "TRUTH: The 'Way of Dichotomy': Dichotomous Tables and John Milton s Paradise Lost" with an overview of dichotomous tables published as appendices to the Bible in early modern England, arguing that they serve both to represent its matter, in the form of genealogies, tables of contents, and reading guides, and to model a way of thinking through relational and hierarchized categories.
First, international law is, as we have seen, a weakly hierarchized law, such that the case of movement from a European legal hierarchy to a purported international legal hierarchy appears to be purely academic.
If it were possible to imagine a more comprehensive account of the forms of subjection and unfree labor that haunt Britain's imperial past and conceptions of modernity, it would require an account of the ways in which racialized, gendered, and classed difference was hierarchized in extraordinarily complex and shifting ways, creating constitutive insides and outsides.