hierarchy

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Hierarchy

In human relations, governance in which who is in power over whom is clearly defined. For example, a hierarchy may exist with a company owner and three employees in that the owner is in charge of the employees. Hierarchy is easy to understand; power structures are marked and followed. It may be contrasted with a heterarchy, but one may exist within the other.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

hierarchy

  1. any pattern of social relationships where some individuals have AUTHORITY over others.
  2. the vertical structure of an ORGANIZATION. Generally there will be a number of management levels in the hierarchy with each having authority over the one beneath it. In a very small organization there might be only two levels in the hierarchy – the manager and the managed. In larger organizations the number will be greater, though it is rarely above eight. Organizations with a high number of levels are said to be tall whilst those with only two or three are said to be flat. There is an inverse relationship with the SPAN OF CONTROL. Where the latter is high, i.e. each manager supervises a large number of subordinates, there will be a tendency towards a flat structure. For the same number of total staff, a low span of control will be associated with a tall structure. See ORGANIZATION CHART, DE-LAYERING.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

hierarchy

the ORGANIZATION of economic activities within the FIRM. The internal hierarchy of management levels within the firm can, under certain circumstances, take responsibility for economic transactions rather than conduct them at arm's length through external MARKET relationships. See INTERNALIZATION.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
If it has a wide application it is because, fortunately, theoretical practice often generates unified hierarchized systems.
Another argument relates to the fact that the use of the term "racism" could be misleading, given its link with the ideas of classical racism, namely, the biological criteria on the basis of which human beings were hierarchized, the existence of "races" and the justification of racial classifications, etc.
In a recent article, Sabina Mihelj and Simon Huxtable (2015) have complicated the relationship between temporal structures and hierarchized geographies further, drawing from examples of television in the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.
Ermo strategically displaces the debilitating male gaze and thereby effectively dissolves the hierarchized gender visual politics by mediating Ermo's sexuality through her highly eroticized noodle-making scene.
For each relationship, the author explores how hierarchized thinking about who is controlling whom gives way, on stage, to more complex representations of power and social critique.
His four sociologies correspond to hierarchized positions that compete over disciplinary resources.
In these writers' work, the natural world, as well as the pastoral mode, is self-consciously "de-naturalized." Far from a reaction against the natural or the rural, this stylized transaction with cultural and literary expectations offers subtle, oblique resistance to masculinist norms, including the arbitrary distinctions drawn between nature and culture, hierarchized distinctions with implications for gender and national identity.
In a similar vein, Pierre Bourdieu makes an accurate differentiation between physical, social, and "acquired" space, when he states that in hierarchical societies, spaces become hierarchized and this process is masked "through naturalizing effects that come along with perpetual enrolment of social realities in the natural world" (Bourdieu, 2002: 160).
In parallel with our interest in knowing the subjects' preferences, we wanted to identify their information level about the dance classification and we hierarchized the nominations per subject, according to table 2.
For Foucault, 'the group must not be the organic bond uniting hierarchized individuals, but a constant generator of de-individualization' (1983: xiv).
Moreover, as workers, actors comprised a hugely hierarchized community.