hierarchy

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Hierarchy

In human relations, governance in which who is in power over whom is clearly defined. For example, a hierarchy may exist with a company owner and three employees in that the owner is in charge of the employees. Hierarchy is easy to understand; power structures are marked and followed. It may be contrasted with a heterarchy, but one may exist within the other.

hierarchy

  1. any pattern of social relationships where some individuals have AUTHORITY over others.
  2. the vertical structure of an ORGANIZATION. Generally there will be a number of management levels in the hierarchy with each having authority over the one beneath it. In a very small organization there might be only two levels in the hierarchy – the manager and the managed. In larger organizations the number will be greater, though it is rarely above eight. Organizations with a high number of levels are said to be tall whilst those with only two or three are said to be flat. There is an inverse relationship with the SPAN OF CONTROL. Where the latter is high, i.e. each manager supervises a large number of subordinates, there will be a tendency towards a flat structure. For the same number of total staff, a low span of control will be associated with a tall structure. See ORGANIZATION CHART, DE-LAYERING.

hierarchy

the ORGANIZATION of economic activities within the FIRM. The internal hierarchy of management levels within the firm can, under certain circumstances, take responsibility for economic transactions rather than conduct them at arm's length through external MARKET relationships. See INTERNALIZATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Being a whole within a set of social structures, it holds a primordial place within the overall society (7), where it is inserted, as compared with other structured and hierarchised organisations or human groups.
A major part of the book, it is true, is devoted to deconstructing dominant representations of hybridity by showing how hybridity is not always "transgressive" and emancipatory as touted but often normative and stultifying; not always radically fluid but often "contaminated by forces of discursive centralisation"; not always free from the bane of binarism but often prone to "politicised and hierarchised dualisms, for instance between the rootless and the rooted, the migratory and the sedentary .
Victorian culture was structured around a hierarchised ordering of gender, which placed women economically, socially, sexually and creatively in the lesser position (Malan 1996:12).
They have argued that these hierarchised accounts of mind and body privilege models of masculine disembodied subjectivity and locate women as somehow lesser subjects due to their closer and more intricate relationship with matters of the flesh (Diprose 1994; Shildrick 1997).
As Gilbert and Tompkins suggest, "Carnival is thus suitable as a model for post-colonial representations of the body politic that seek to dismantle the hierarchised corpus of imperial culture" (83).
The underlying idea of Castell's Network Society or Network Informational Society is that networks replace hierarchised and circumscribed relationships (Castells 2000).