hereditament


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Related to hereditament: Incorporeal hereditament, appurtenance

hereditament

Any real or personal property that may be inherited. It would not include a life estate in oneself—meaning a right to land during one's own life but no longer—because that obviously can't be inherited.The word had more importance under older English law because of the ability to place a greater variety of restrictions on land than is possible today.It is often encountered in wills, leaving “all my lands, tenements and hereditaments to my daughter… .“ As a practical matter,only the word “hereditament”is necessary because it includes the other two.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
* Loss of ownership rights such as quiet possession, financing, and hereditaments.
The Stone decision is consistent with the withdrawn opinion in Habeeb, holding that joining in the deeds constituted a waiver of the constitutional homestead rights, even if the deed contained no special waiver language, although like Habeeb, the deeds in the Stone case included a transfer of "hereditaments." (6)
occupation of additional floor space, the building of new hereditaments and the occupation of empty premises.
With cash in hand, Janet offered George Elliot 560 pounds sterling for his half-share in Roope's Plantation, including "all the houses, stores, stages, flakes, gardens, wharfs, ways, privileges, refits, rents, issues, advantages, hereditaments, and appurtenances thereto," (79) which he accepted.
This 1606 "law" unleashed paroxysms of enslavement, mass murder and grand theft as the Europeans enforced their "law" to control "all the Lands, Woods, Soil, Grounds, Havens, Ports, Rivers, Mines, Minerals, Marshes, Waters, Fishings, commodities, and Hereditaments", "granted" them by King James I under the Charter.
According to Obaseki (1988) Land includes land of any tenure, buildings or parts of buildings (whether the division is horizontal, vertical, or made in any other way), and other corporeal hereditaments. In Nigeria's traditional setting, for instance, land was not viewed as a mere economic tool, rather it had religious and other social functions.
made a denizen (except such as [are] born of English parents) shall be capable to be of the privy council or a member of either House of Parliament or to enjoy any office or place of trust either civil or military or to have any grant of lands tenements or hereditaments from the crown to himself or to any other or others in trust for him.
In the past, like name, estate, rank, title, and all the other entitlements and hereditaments whose sum made the individual what he was, beauty was an inalienable quality of his or her identity, forming an immutable part of the diverse and complex hierarchies of which social life was wrought.