On

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Related to heel: Heel spur, heel pain

On

Used in the context of general equities. Conjunction that denotes trade execution /indication, usually during a pre-opening look. "Looks 6 on 6000 shares at opening." See: for/at.
References in classic literature ?
But it were ridiculous to assert that the Iron Heel was a necessary stepping- stone.
Nor even then, as the Everhard Manuscript well shows, was any permanence attributed to the Iron Heel.
It is quite clear that she intended the Manuscript for immediate publication, as soon as the Iron Heel was overthrown, so that her husband, so recently dead, should receive full credit for all that he had ventured and accomplished.
Undoubtedly she was executed by the Mercenaries; and, as is well known, no record of such executions was kept by the Iron Heel.
The pony behaved well, sir, and showed no vice; but at last he just threw up his heels and tipped the young gentleman into the thorn hedge.
Too oft, verily, did I follow close to the heels of truth: then did it kick me on the face.
Dorothy now took Toto up solemnly in her arms, and having said one last good-bye she clapped the heels of her shoes together three times, saying:
com 5 THE FUTURE'S BRIGHT Heavenly Soles pointed court shoes with block heel extra-wide fit PS28, Simply Be, simplybe.
The heel of a shoe can change the entire look, from easy going chunky sandals to edgy rock and roll booties.
My heavy duty boots with their deep moulded chunky heels and soles are perfect for inclement weather, but with one major drawback - every step packed more snow under the heel and after only a few steps, you guessed it, I was tottering on high heels.
They feature a reinforced heel and toe, shock absorbing zone cushioning, mesh for breathability, superior fit in heel cups, and arch compression for support, as well a hidden inspirational message on each pair.
The higher the heel, the more the foot slides inside the shoe and the greater the pressure and friction under the heel, the ball of the foot, and the big toe.