block

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Block

Large quantity of stock or large dollar amount of bonds held or traded. As a rule of thumb, 10,000 shares or more of stock and $200,000 or more worth of bonds would be described as a block.

Block

An exceptionally large amount or value of securities. While there is no specific definition of how many shares constitute a block, most people using the term refer to holding or trading more than 10,000 shares and/or shares worth more than $200,000. Almost invariably, trades of this magnitude involve institutional investors. See also: Block trade, Secondary issue.

block

A large amount of a security, usually 10,000 shares or more.

block

An area bounded by perimeter streets.Many subdivision descriptions employ a subdivision name,and then a block number and a lot number to identify particular properties.The numbers are assigned when the subdivision developer files its plat plan with local authorities.

References in periodicals archive ?
Since no therapy has been successful for the treatment of complete heart block, the focus has shifted to prevention of the condition, which appears to occur because of scarring of the conduction system that results from inflammation triggered by the mother's antibodies.
An implantable synchronous pacemaker for the long term correction of complete heart block.
The present study was designed to look for the presence of ischemic heart disease in patients who presents with heart blocks requiring permanent pacemaker.
Super-delayed complete heart block associated with device closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defect (in Chinese).
The tissue damage that causes complete heart block is most usual in elderly people and is closely linked to coronary artery disease, for which lifestyle factors, such as smoking, increase the risk.
Doctors diagnosed that she had a complete heart block and said a pacemaker needed to be fitted.
The electrocardiogram (ECG) showed a first degree heart block with a widened ORS complex with O waves and ST elevation in leads I, 11, III, aVF and V1-4 (Figure 1), suggestive of possible acute myocardial infarction.
Patients with atrioventricular heart block and/or myopericarditis may be treated with either oral or parenteral antibiotic therapy for 14 days.
Damage to these fibres causes heart block and where this damage is dictates the severity of the condition.
Pineau noted that anti-Ro antibodies, present in approximately one-third of patients with lupus, are known to be associated with the development of irreversible heart block in 1%-2% of neonates whose mothers carry the autoantibodies.