Hearsay

(redirected from hearsay evidence)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Hearsay

Evidence gathered from a second-hand or even further removed source. That is, the person giving hearsay evidence did not witness or experience the evidence himself/herself. In many jurisdictions, hearsay evidence is not admissible in court, especially in criminal proceedings. There are, however, a number of exceptions to this rule, notably if the original witness is unavailable or dead.
References in periodicals archive ?
flexibility allows for the admission of hearsay evidence without
costs associated with hearsay evidence, requiring motions in limine,
Sometimes the propositions contained within some hearsay evidence are true and are useful to reaching a correct verdict.
(a) Hearsay evidence is presumptively inadmissible unless it falls under an exception to the hearsay rule.
(31) The admissibility of hearsay evidence at a probation violation hearing varies greatly from state to state and creates issues surrounding a probationer's constitutional rights to due process and confrontation.
"He confined himself to repeating his general injunction against treating the hearsay evidence of those two witnesses as evidence of the truth of [V's] assertions.
Had I included all the hearsay evidence I collected, the picture of Grant would have been even darker than the one I presented.
Here is an example: based on nothing but hearsay evidence, Pennsylvania "family" courts routinely remove children from their parents and award custody to grandparents.
Protections like the rule against hearsay evidence are sometimes dismissed as ''technicalities,'' but they serve the vital purpose of protecting defendants' rights.
* Hearsay--When an objection is made to the introduction of hearsay evidence, a common response is, "Hearsay is admissible in Section 120.57 hearings." It is true that hearsay evidence can be admitted in administrative hearings, but it has limited usefulness for the offering party.
One example of judge-made law which generally is of great use to the Crown and of little or no benefit to an accused is in the area of hearsay evidence and the ability of the Crown to prove its case even without calling witnesses whose testimony might in earlier days have been considered crucial.
Allowing an application for judicial review by lawyers for the parents of driver Henri Paul against the coroner's decision, the judges said: "The hearsay evidence has to be admitted by calling a witness."