Hawkish

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Hawkish

An aggressive tone. For example, if the Federal Reserve uses hawkish language to describe the threat of inflation, one could reasonably expect stronger actions from the Fed. There is a similar application to CEO describing an important issue that a firm faces. Opposite of Dovish.

Hawkish

Describing a statement from the Federal Reserve indicating that it may raise interest rates. The statement is called hawkish because it indicates that the Fed believes that the inflation rate is high enough to warrant concern. See also: Dovish.
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To bolster the external validity of our model, we also examine (2) the extent to which exposure to media coverage of Palestinian pain and suffering and empathy toward Palestinians still significantly predict Jewish-Israeli recognition of Palestinian pain and suffering when the respondents' degree of hawkishness, level of education, and socioeconomic are added to the model as predictors.
After attending his lecture at the Middle East Institute in Washington, a senior IPS journalist told me he was astounded by the extreme hawkishness of Hoodbhoy's views.
We can add that, for Israelis who realized Hamas cannot be eradicated, the invasion boiled down to showing hawkishness as a weapon for next month's elections.
Her hawkishness on Iran would be welcome and a break from Obama's dovish instincts," said Saudi political analyst Khaled al-Dakhil.
He argues that Kennedy was slowly, and in contradictory manner, turning away from the Cold War hawkishness of his younger years towards peace.
Even the ECB's hawkishness could eventually be reversed.
Like most Israeli political leaders, Rabin had his own personal history of hawkishness.
Their hawkishness shocked me - they ticked off people they needed to talk to and wouldn't be redirected
She is appalled by Hillary's hawkishness, her equivocation on gay marriage, and her three-day delay in rebutting Gen.
In a surprising turn away from his usual hawkishness, Walter scoffs at the Gulf War because it is so transparently motivated by economic interests.
There is little indication of their malignant hawkishness.
Another factor contributing to RFK's hawkishness was his emotional state: he felt angry, as he had at the time of the Bay of Pigs disaster, consumed by a desire for revenge against what he perceived to be the humiliation inflicted upon his brother.