Hallmark

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Hallmark

In marketing, a distinguishing feature of a product that makes it recognizable to potential buyers. A hallmark may be a significant intangible asset for a product.
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References in classic literature ?
The criminal meant to entrap some one of the race of men in the high hall. He went under the welkin, until he saw most clearly the wine hall, the treasure house of men, variegated with vessels.
Each night, after Sierra Vista had gone to bed, she rose and let in White Fang to sleep in the big hall. Now White Fang was not a house-dog, nor was he permitted to sleep in the house; so each morning, early, she slipped down and let him out before the family was awake.
Dramatic as was the moment it was suddenly rendered trebly so by the noisy opening of the doors leading to The Hall of Chiefs.
"You'll do, for a beginner," Hall cried, slapping him jovially on the bare shoulder.
The wheels died away down the drive while Sir Henry and I turned into the hall, and the door clanged heavily behind us.
Dempsey nodded at Andy and William McMahan, the secretary of the club, and walked rapidly toward a door at the rear of the hall. Two other members of the Give and Take Association swiftly joined the little group.
A few paces distant, an enormous pillar, then another, then another; seven pillars in all, down the length of the hall, sustaining the spring of the arches of the double vault, in the centre of its width.
Though the good people of the Parsonage never went to the Hall and shunned the horrid old dotard its owner, yet they kept a strict knowledge of all that happened there, and were looking out every day for the catastrophe for which Miss Horrocks was also eager.
"Hold!" he cried, and, turning directly to Roger de Leybourn, "I have no quarrel with thee, My Lord; but again I come for a guest within thy halls. Methinks thou hast as bad taste in whom thou entertains as didst thy fair lady."
"We stop at Belford on our way back, to see some friends of my husband, and we hope to get to Redwood Hall in good time on the
Fentolin, for some reason or other, very much resented my leaving the Hall and was very annoyed at my insisting upon claiming the Tower.
But she gazes beyond the salon, back into the big dining hall, where the white crepe myrtle grows.