Habit

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Habit

A normal custom of an individual or group. Habits greatly influence economic behavior at both the micro- and macro- levels. For example, one may develop the habit of only shopping at certain stores, whether or not they have the best products or prices. Likewise, the majority of farmers in a country may only grow certain crops, whether or not those are the best for the land or the market. Habits may be positive or negative, and are often both, depending on one's perspective.
References in classic literature ?
I will mention only two other birds, which are very common, and render themselves prominent from their habits. The Saurophagus sulphuratus is typical of the great American tribe of tyrant-flycatchers.
These birds in many respects resemble in their habits the Carranchas.
Therefore set it down, that an habit of secrecy, is both politic and moral.
The best composition and temperature, is to have openness in fame and opinion; secrecy in habit; dissimulation in seasonable use; and a power to feign, if there be no remedy.
My bride looked charmingly in a green silk calash and riding habit of pelisse cloth; and whenever her red lips parted with a smile, each tooth appeared like an inestimable pearl.
The most awful circumstance of the affair is yet to be told: for this ogre, or whatever it was, had a riding habit like Mrs.
I have watched the habits of the animal, young man; and can fearlessly pronounce, by evidence that would be thrown away on ordinary observers, that it is of vast dimensions, inactive, possibly torpid, of voracious appetite, and, as it now appears by the direct testimony of this venerable hunter, ferocious and carnivorous!"
"As to that, if I wanted evidence of a fact, which is abundantly apparent by the habits of the animal, I have the word of Ishmael himself.
We did say that habits and dispositions were relative.
One sort of quality let us call 'habit' or 'disposition'.
Again, after speaking of the frustration of some impulses which is involved in acquiring the habits of a civilized adult, he continues:
In South America, a burrowing rodent, the tuco-tuco, or Ctenomys, is even more subterranean in its habits than the mole; and I was assured by a Spaniard, who had often caught them, that they were frequently blind; one which I kept alive was certainly in this condition, the cause, as appeared on dissection, having been inflammation of the nictitating membrane.