Habit

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Habit

A normal custom of an individual or group. Habits greatly influence economic behavior at both the micro- and macro- levels. For example, one may develop the habit of only shopping at certain stores, whether or not they have the best products or prices. Likewise, the majority of farmers in a country may only grow certain crops, whether or not those are the best for the land or the market. Habits may be positive or negative, and are often both, depending on one's perspective.
References in classic literature ?
So it is with all other dispositions also, unless through lapse of time a disposition has itself become inveterate and almost impossible to dislodge: in which case we should perhaps go so far as to call it a habit.
Again, after speaking of the frustration of some impulses which is involved in acquiring the habits of a civilized adult, he continues:
In the following lectures, accordingly, this term will disappear until we have dealt with words, when it will re-emerge as mainly a trivial and unimportant outcome of linguistic habits.
On this view, the capacity of enduring the most different climates by man himself and by his domestic animals, and such facts as that former species of the elephant and rhinoceros were capable of enduring a glacial climate, whereas the living species are now all tropical or sub-tropical in their habits, ought not to be looked at as anomalies, but merely as examples of a very common flexibility of constitution, brought, under peculiar circumstances, into play.
We may often falsely attribute to correlation of growth, structures which are common to whole groups of species, and which in truth are simply due to inheritance; for an ancient progenitor may have acquired through natural selection some one modification in structure, and, after thousands of generations, some other and independent modification; and these two modifications, having been transmitted to a whole group of descendants with diverse habits, would naturally be thought to be correlated in some necessary manner.
The number, tameness, and disgusting habits of the carrion-feeding hawks of South America make them pre-eminently striking to any one accustomed only to the birds of Northern Europe.
These false eagles most rarely kill any living bird or animal; and their vulture-like, necrophagous habits are very evident to any one who has fallen asleep on the desolate plains of Patagonia, for when he wakes, he will see, on each surrounding hillock, one of these birds patiently watching him with an evil eye: it is a feature in the landscape of these countries, which will be recognised by every one who has wandered over them.
Therefore set it down, that an habit of secrecy, is both politic and moral.
My bride looked charmingly in a green silk calash and riding habit of pelisse cloth; and whenever her red lips parted with a smile, each tooth appeared like an inestimable pearl.
The most awful circumstance of the affair is yet to be told: for this ogre, or whatever it was, had a riding habit like Mrs.
As to that, if I wanted evidence of a fact, which is abundantly apparent by the habits of the animal, I have the word of Ishmael himself.
Why should she not study the habits of any animal, even though it were a rhinoceros?