Guild

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Guild

An association of persons with a particular skill or trade. For example, the electricians in an area may form a guild for mutual support, to route business to each other, or for other reasons. A guild contrasts with a union primarily because it includes both employers and employees; it is based on trade, rather than class. Guilds were most common in medieval Europe, but still exist and have a great deal of sway in some industries, notably filmmaking. Bar associations of lawyers and realtor groups may also be considered guilds.
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References in periodicals archive ?
What deserves our attention here is the guildsmen's claim that performance (based on the "matter" of the pageants) had something to say about work offstage.
Within it the guildsmen took their duties seriously, with plenty of banquets and revelry.
Traditionally, they were presented for three days around the festival of Corpus Christi and enacted by guildsmen and craftsmen in improvised settings.
It was established in 1352 by the two Cambridge guilds of Corpus Christi and the Blessed Virgin Mary to train priests in theology and canon law, and to provide prayers for the souls of guildsmen departed.
In Italian towns, prominent families, clans, factions, tower societies, guildsmen, youth abbeys, and minorities, such as Jews and foreigners, fought or negotiated for their own spatial autonomy and distinctive place in the community.
Prussian and French intervention - secularization, constitutional reform, freedom of trades - eroded the power base of clerics and guildsmen while laying the groundwork for the formation of a new municipal elite.
While the actors of the late fifteenth century had been amateurs, guildsmen or the servants of noble houses, early in the sixteenth century acting began to become a profession, or at least a trade.
Schama cites a number of examples of Bourbon hubris, but seems unaware how odious and, in time, how intolerable such behavior and rhetoric might seem to eighteenth century merchants, farmers, guildsmen and shopkeepers (not to mention aristocrats and churchmen, whose own hubris was being encroached upon).
Thus the herald's speech works on several levels: he voices the bible's command that the Levites 'minister before the Ark' and he metatheatrically prompts the guildsmen to administer their performance of the pageant.
(35) Another internal matter involves guildsmen: a draper (strazario) and a mercer settled an argument over a house in the drapers' guildhall before witnesses who included two notaries, two officers of the guild, a draper, and a jacket-maker.
They marched as one united body, but the mayor and aldermen escorted the consecrated eucharistic host more closely than common councillors, councillors more closely than guildsmen, higher-status crafts before lower.
Certainly we have reason to believe that the attitude toward the republic -- so critical to the viability of its palace -- would have been newly sanguine and increasingly optimistic, for it had now proven itself by having survived a long, bitter war, quasi-revolutionary constitutional reform, and counterrevolution, which ended in the violent attempt to bring down the republic in July 1295 by the massed magnati that was quickly put down by the guildsmen. In the eyes of the powerful mercantile and professional class, the project probably was becoming a better potential investment, certainly a more affordable one in these peaceful, prosperous times.