Monkey

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Related to guenon: Cercopithecus

Monkey

In the United Kingdom, a slang term for 500 pounds.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The talapoins belong to a large group of monkey known as guenons, which can be found across Africa today and are usually larger than Nanopithecus browni.
and keeps in touch with staff at Monkey World, said the two guenons continue to improve in their new British surroundings.
In response to the argument that modern Gnosticism gives rise to political apathy, he points to Hesse's call to know oneself, David-Neel's anti-colonialism, Schrodinger's ideas about the oneness of consciousness and Guenon's "perennialism" as "ways of thinking, acting, and being modern that are characterized by openness and responsibility for others, nonviolence and respect for the natural world" (p.
Actualites Eecrit par Adnane Mourchid Kamal Guenon, coach de la Rabita Le tirage au sort de la Coupe d'Afrique des Nations 2016 de handball a place la selection marocaine dans un group difficile compose de l'Egypte (pays d'hote), l'Algerie (tenante du titre) en plus du Cameroun, Nigeria et Gabon.
Modern society in general is in crisis and the greatest thinkers of the time, like Rene Guenon, Ivan Kropek, etc.
The discrepancy may be best observed in King's account of his most unusual hero of antimodernism, Rene Guenon (1886-1951), a Frenchman who "spent the final 20 years of his life in Egypt living the life of a traditional Muslim." Unsurprisingly, "His criticism was of Western civilization itself, not merely particular political structures" (31).
A different way of expressing Islamic religiosity within the Romanian Muslim communities belongs to the Sufi-oriented Muslims that are either intellectual Romanian converts who approach Islam from an esoteric metaphysical perspective, in the line of Rene Guenon's perennialism, or Sufi Turkish Muslims that attend special mosques centered on a more intense ritualistic Sufi practice, or converts and immigrants that follow a special Sunni-Sufi interpretation of Islam promoted in Romania by the Fattabiouni project that is quite paradigmatic for this group.