Guardian

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Guardian

An individual or trust institution appointed by a court to care for a minor or an incompetent person and his or her property.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Guardian

A non-parent who is legally responsible for a minor child or mentally incompetent person. A guardian may be designated by a parent, perhaps in a will, or one may be appointed by a court. More than one guardian may be designated for a single person, each with his/her own areas of responsibility. For example, a child may live with one guardian while another is responsible for administering assets left to the child in his/her parent's estate.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Guardian.

A guardian is someone you designate to be legally responsible for your minor children or other dependents who are unable to take care of themselves if you are unavailable to provide for their care.

You may name the guardian in your will or while you are still alive. In most cases, a guardian makes both personal and financial decisions for his or her ward.

However, you may name two guardians with different areas of responsibility -- perhaps one for financial matters if you have a substantial estate. If you become disabled or otherwise unable to manage your own affairs, the appropriate court in your state may name a guardian to manage your affairs.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

guardian

A person who operates under court supervision and handles the affairs of a party—the ward—who is incapable of doing so.Wards may be minor children or those adjudged incompetent. Guardians may execute deeds on behalf of their wards. In some states, a guardian may not place a mortgage on property owned by the ward, nor may the guardian buy property subject to a mortgage.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
guardianships currently provide a ready and expedient remedy.
guardianships and aging, and have been endorsed by a range of entities
ProPublica Illinois found more than 40 guardianship cases fitting this profile filed between January 2018 and June 2019 in Lake County alone.
The university now asks more questions of students who have recently entered into a guardianship, including whether they have contact with their parents, who they live with and who pays for their health insurance and cellphone bill.
An estimated 3 million American adults have been placed into guardianships, including as many 65,000 Floridians who are deemed "wards of the state." Due to the aging US population, from longer life spans and 10,000 baby boomers turning 65 every day, the number of wards are increasing at a rate of 10% annually.
While the existing research on relative guardianship has limitations, guardianship remans a crucial permanency option.
Groups and individuals with a stake in the protection of Floridians who may need or who are currently under legal guardianship are coming together to seek common solutions and better serve the needs of the state's most vulnerable.
New York, the plaintiff asserted that "[f]or decades, individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities have been deprived of their constitutional rights and discriminated against because of their disabilities by New York State's Unified Court System through the appointment of plenary guardians pursuant to Article 17-A." (83) The lawsuit was filed "to defend the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution." (84) The plaintiff criticized the differing procedures used for appointing guardianships in New York State, and highlighted the deprivations of rights of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
Some see SDM as an alternative to guardianship, while others view it as an attempt to remove the legal instrument that provides a safety net for vulnerable individuals.
Members of The Florida Bar Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section's (RPPTL) Guardianship, Power of Attorney and Advance Directives Committee are keenly aware that there have been major changes to Florida's guardianship laws in the last several years.
Under the new law, veteran-specific guardians will be appointed under the existing provisions of the Oklahoma Guardianship and Conservatorship Act.