factor

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Factor

A financial institution that buys a firm's accounts receivable and collects the accounts.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Factor

A third party that buys a firm's accounts receivable. If a firm is not confident in its ability to collect on its credit sales, it may sell the right to receive payment to the factor at a discount. The factor then assumes the credit risk associated with the accounts receivable. This provides the firm immediate access to working capital, which is important, especially if the firm has a cash flow problem. The price of factoring is determined by the creditworthiness of the firm's customer, not of the firm itself. It is also known as accounts receivable financing.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

factor

A firm that purchases accounts receivable from another firm at a discount. The purchasing firm then attempts to collect the receivables.

factor

To sell accounts receivable to another party at a discount from face value. Thus, a firm in need of cash to pay down short-term debt may decide to factor its accounts receivable to another firm.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

factor

  1. a firm that purchases TRADE DEBTS from client firms. See FACTORING.
  2. a firm that buys in bulk and performs a WHOLESALING function.
  3. an input (for example raw material, labour, capital) which is used to produce a good or provide a service.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

factor

  1. 1a FACTOR INPUT that is used in production (see NATURAL RESOURCES, LABOUR, CAPITAL).
  2. a business that buys in bulk and performs a WHOLESALING function.
  3. a business that buys trade debts from client firms (at some agreed price below the nominal value of the debts) and then arranges to recover them for itself. See FACTOR MARKET, FACTORING.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Possible interactions between gonadotrophs and somatotrophs in the pituitary of tilapia: apparent roles for insulin-like growth factor I and estradiol.
Therefore, "appropriate use of growth factors should be prospectively evaluated as a modifiable means to prevent treatment discontinuation," they recommended.
Presence of epidermal growth factor during in vitro maturation of pig oocytes and embryo culture can modulate blastocyst development after in vitro fertilization.
Exocrine glands such as salivary glands, lacrimal glands and mammary glands secrete a variety of peptide growth factors which are crucial for their development, cellular proliferation, differentiation and healing (Kouidhi et al., 2012).
For this study, the researchers designed two -dimensional (2D) mineral nanoparticles to deliver growth factors for a prolonged duration to overcome this drawback.
He further added, "The sustained delivery of growth factors resulted in enhanced stem cell differentiation towards cartilage lineage and can be used for treatment of osteoarthritis."
Fibroblast growth factor 23 and klotho serum levels in healthy children.
There is a key function of Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 in repair of wounds; it is a strong chemotactic factor for fibroblasts and activates them to produce main extracellular matrix components like collagen.
Effect of thyroid hormone on epidermal growth factor gene expression in mouse submandibular gland.
"We concluded that transplantation of MSCs is more likely to enhance bone and cartilage regeneration when these cells were engineered to express growth factors a finding that supports the use of MSCs as 'factories' to more safely produce a sustained release of low levels of bFGF over a controlled period for injury repair," Dr.
* Replenishing four growth factors--epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF)--through topical application has been shown to diminish wrinkles, improve elasticity, and restore moisture to rejuvenate aging skin.
Fibroblast Growth Factors: Biology and Clinical Application: FGF Biology and Therapeutics

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