Grape

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Grape

Slang; in auto sales, a customer who believes whatever the salesperson tells him/her and who is generally agreeable. The term connotes a customer who will pay top price for an automobile.
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When grapevine red blotch virus (GRBV) and grapevine Pinot gris virus (GPGV) were recently discovered, they had to be sequenced before researchers could construct new diagnostic assays to detect them (Al Rwahnih et al.
Having an AI delivered comments and profile drawing engine enables Grapevine to index comments made in response to influencer generated content and provides significant data points which can be leveraged by brands and agencies for greater ROI on their advertising campaigns with precision targeting.
Aside from selling the grapevine crafts, I have also made them as thank-you gifts to those who help us manage our vineyard throughout the year.
Grapevine will play a pivotal role in SSC's consumer asset digitization strategy.
With Grapevine, tokenised celebrity influencer monetisation opportunities can be taken to new heights.
(2) The severity of the GLRD effects can vary from one season to the next and is dependent on a number of factors including grapevine variety, scion/rootstock combination, virus strain, climate, soil, cultural practices, stress factors, etc.
As a bonus, any grapevine will supply you with leaves for stuffing and canes for weaving.
vitis attaches itself to the underground portion of the grapevine. However, in the case of grapevines, wounding events such as freezing injuries are often associated with an outbreak of crown gall because exposed wounded tissues are more susceptible to infection by R.
Last year's city, Las Vegas, takes a backseat to almost none, but the Dallas Metroplex that surrounds the Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine offers many unique opportunities.
Also as in fairy tales--the violent ones of the Brothers Grimm, not the sanitized Disney versions--"Grapevine" elevates the idiosyncratic and extraordinary to the status of the universal, and revels in blunt, ominous scenes: A man, arms outstretched, wearing a cheap plastic mask, and with a hand clasped over his mouth, stumbles in darkness.