Grandfather clause


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Grandfather clause

A provision included in a new rule or regulation that exempts a business that is already conducting business in the area addressed by the regulation from penalty or restriction.

Grandfather Clause

A clause in a new law, regulation, or anything else that exempts certain persons or businesses from abiding by it. For example, suppose a country passes a law stating that it is illegal to own a cat. A grandfather clause would allow persons who already own cats to continue to keep them, but would prevent people who do not own cats from buying them. Grandfather clauses are controversial, but they are also relatively common.
References in periodicals archive ?
Councilman John Bullock, the bill's sponsor, said Monday afternoon he doesn't believe the suggested grandfather clause could be used in that manner.
The most striking example of the unfairness of the "Grandfather Clause" is with the provinces of Nova Scotia and Manitoba.
But as with the grandfather clause, it's up to the administration to turn the law's general language into clear regulations.
Although my editorial did not directly deal with the complex issue of recertification per se, I acknowledge that the grandfather clause is controversial.
49 also calls for the immediate elimination of the ITFA grandfather clause permitting state and local governments to continue levying Internet access taxes that were "imposed and actually enforced prior to October 1, 1998." S.
It's no different from the Grandfather Clause. Once used in southern states, the Grandfather Clause barred African Americans from voting if they or their descendants had not exercised that right prior to 1867.
BE IT RESOLVED that ANNA supports the position that the minimum preparation for beginning professional practice is the baccalaureate degree in nursing and that the minimum preparation for beginning technical nursing practice is the associate degree in nursing, only if a grandfather clause is incorporated.
The old plants benefited from a grandfather clause under the 1970 Clean Air Act that allowed them to continue operating without cleaning up.
In addition, the law does not include a grandfather clause, meaning that a company can't use an individual's information if it doesn't have his or her consent when the law takes effect--even if the data was collected 10 years ago.
For example, it begins by talking about a non-existent "grandfather clause" in the Clean Air Act.
1934 CaICPA members reject a "grandfather clause" in the accountancy act that suggested licensing all public accountants as CPAs.
It is also worth noting that OSHA has, in the past, incorporated a grandfather clause in its standard.