Haitian Gourde

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Haitian Gourde

The currency of Haiti. It was introduced in 1872, replacing another currency that was also called the gourde. It was initially pegged to the French franc, but this was switched to the U.S. dollar in 1912 at a rate of five gourdes to one dollar. Since 1989, the gourde has been a floating currency. Interestingly, the peg is maintained in colloquial speech, in which people refer to five gourdes as a Haitian dollar. Often, prices are even given in Haitian dollars.
References in periodicals archive ?
Institutions are required to report to the UCREF any transaction involving funds that appear to be derived from a crime, as well as those exceeding 200,000 gourdes. Failure to report such transactions is punishable by more than three years' imprisonment and a fine of 20 million gourdes (approximately $542,000).
By charging half a gourde per bucket, the project will generate an annual revenue of two million gourdes, based on annual consumption of 20 million gallons of water in all the benefiting communities.
We know that the minimum daily wage in Haiti is just 36 gourdes [US$1.30] and that doesn't cover our daily needs.
Rosemene explains that for an eight- to eight-and-a-half-hour day, a factory worker earns 36 gourdes (US $1 = approx.
The embargo has brought on inflation and left half the work force jobless with "an average wage of about twenty gourdes for eight hours of work," according to Raymond Lafontant Jr., executive director of the Association of Industries of Haiti.
Moise, before he came to power in 2017, headed a company which received more than 33 million Gourdes to do the road work, though the company in principle did nothing but grow bananas.
There's also a "Happy Thanksgiving" sticker available along with a pretty place setting of animated decorative gourdes and a set table complete with animated candle sticks. 
We have to fight with them," said Molier Benoit, whose syndicate doubled its fares to 12 gourdes (31 cents) for a ride in a metal frame built onto the back of a truck.
The game, retailing for about US$9 (370 Haitian gourdes), has been called a "game that dehumanizes all groups of people" by the Minneapolis-based National Institute on Media and the Family.