Gouge

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Gouge

In numismatics, a significant scratch or other blemish on a coin, usually more than normal wear and tear. This may affect the coin's value for collectors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most fault zones can be modelled by using three mechanical elements: a gouge zone with wall rock on both sides.
For a conventional double-direct shear friction test, samples consisted of gouge layers sandwiched between forcing blocks in a triple block geometry, as shown in Figure 1(b).
Once you add the hardener, you've only got a 10- to 20-minute "open" time, so mix small batches and work on one gouge at a time.
Cut a U-shaped groove into the gouge with a high-speed die grinder or rotary tool and burr nose bit.
Drawing on de Gouges' writings and a limited number of secondary works, Mousset offers a clear, chronological narrative of de Gouges' life from her early childhood in Montauban to her execution in Paris in 1793.
Inspired by the women of Paris who, in 1993 (the bicentennial of the Terror and of de Gouges' execution), demanded that French authorities move de Gouges' remains to the nation's most hallowed necropolis, the Pantheon, (3) Mousset echoes the call to venerate de Gouges alongside France's "greatest men." Her book is well-written, accessible to a broad audience, and rich in the reproduction of de Gouges' writings.
The ERP and VLRS fittings for repairing butt fusion joints or severe pipeline gouges will provide the following benefits:
The patch can also be used as a repair for pipes that have small-size defects or gouges. The fitting is distributed by NUPI Americas and Mulcare (in the Northeast).
Relief carving is usually done with full size gouges and a mallet.
makes tools with fixed handles, and blades and gouges that fit into a handle made to take a variety of tools.
Olympe de Gouges was the illegitimate child of an aristocratic father and ignoble mother.
A point load of up to 50kg (110lb) simulates a sharp protrusion, such as a rock, attempting to gouge the coating surface.