globalization

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Globalization

Tendency toward a worldwide investment environment, and the integration of national capital markets
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Globalization

The integration of global markets by the reduction trade barriers, improved communication, foreign direct investment, and other means. Globalization allows a multinational corporation to make a product in one country and sell it in another. This provides jobs in one country and less expensive goods in the other. Globalization also allows for the free flow of capital between countries, which many believe spurs economic growth. Proponents of globalization argue that it allows developing countries to continue and hasten their levels of development, and that it protects consumers in developed countries. Opponents believe that globalization serves the interests of multinational corporations at the expense of small businesses, which sends jobs to other countries needlessly.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve; and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES to grow to service global markets. See INTERNATIONALIZATION.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve, and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES to grow to service global markets.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The concept of globalization emerged as a buzzword for the 1990s and the new millennium and quickly became a dominant concept in various scholarly fields, including economics, sociology, and media studies.
One of the main features that distinguishes globalization from economic interdependence is the fact that globalization transcends the mere economic realm because it affects all social arenas in different ways and magnitudes, and focuses on both processes and outcomes.
Indeed, various fields of the social sciences have developed a rich array of diverse accounts on globalization. The move from the international to the global level of analysis implies an attempt of systemic and complex modeling to make sense of the big picture, instead of a compartmentalized view of the social realities.
(25) Gender patterns and maternal obligations lie deep within culture and contemporary trends affecting married women's migration in the context of globalization have as much, if not more, potential for cultural destabilization, as child labor or child migration do.
We need to bring these differences to the fore as we examine globalization. While globalization is having effects worldwide, those effects are neither the same everywhere nor have uniform consequences.
Thus, contemporary globalization may be effectively distinguishable from earlier migrations in its altered effects on patterns of social mobility.
Globalization 1.0 was pre-World War 1 globalization, which was launched by a historic drop in trade costs when steam and other forms of mechanical power made it economical to consume goods made faraway.
Globalization back then fanned the fortunes of a nation's most competitive citizens and companies but fractured the fortunes of a nation's least competitive citizens and companies.
One way to achieve greater specificity in the analysis of globalization is to explore the impacts of globalization processes in localized context.
In focusing on the lives of workers along the border, Bacon demystifies the abstractions of globalization, showing that the global economy is "a day-to-day, hour-to-hour reality experienced by millions of people." (3)
think it is high time that studies of globalization also attended more
Whether theorized as structure, process, or epoch, globalization is