globalization

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Globalization

Tendency toward a worldwide investment environment, and the integration of national capital markets

Globalization

The integration of global markets by the reduction trade barriers, improved communication, foreign direct investment, and other means. Globalization allows a multinational corporation to make a product in one country and sell it in another. This provides jobs in one country and less expensive goods in the other. Globalization also allows for the free flow of capital between countries, which many believe spurs economic growth. Proponents of globalization argue that it allows developing countries to continue and hasten their levels of development, and that it protects consumers in developed countries. Opponents believe that globalization serves the interests of multinational corporations at the expense of small businesses, which sends jobs to other countries needlessly.

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve; and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES to grow to service global markets. See INTERNATIONALIZATION.

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve, and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES to grow to service global markets.
References in periodicals archive ?
By "ontological changes" we mean that globalization is more than a set of profound changes in capital and trade flows, and rather manifests a substantial change in the way that we attempt to explain and make sense of the world.
So if we do not get the big picture of globalization in a holistic manner, we risk the problem of creating theories or models with many possible causal variables leading to inherent difficulties in isolating the importance and weight of any one of the component parts.
No doubt, the concept of globalization is challenging and puzzling in terms of the attempts to theorize about it, mainly because it is a much more encompassing and complex phenomenon than international relations.
This global politics literature focuses on explaining and understanding how and why the processes and different dimensions of globalization challenge and affect conventional political forms (i.
The effects of globalization for education in the United States are not hard to find.
Globalization is currently playing this out on an even grander scale, as large cities become huge, and smaller towns become substantial cities.
Today, globalization makes possible access to children for sexual purposes, including for internet pornography, almost anywhere in the world.
In our conference discussions of children and globalization, we have come to acknowledge important differences between young children and older children.
In the early twenty-first century, many non-Americans see globalization as an extension of American power and reject it on these grounds, even though they may know that this rejection will be costly and will increase poverty.
Many modern critics of globalization in both developed and emerging countries claim that they want not a reversal but a better or more human or less imperial sort of globalization.
Some analysts argue that lasting cultural rigidities will obstruct or perhaps even reverse the globalization process.
JAGDISH BHAGWATI Senior Follow, Council on Foreign Relations, and University Professor, Columbia University; author of In Defense of Globalization (Oxford, 2004)