globalization

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Globalization

Tendency toward a worldwide investment environment, and the integration of national capital markets

Globalization

The integration of global markets by the reduction trade barriers, improved communication, foreign direct investment, and other means. Globalization allows a multinational corporation to make a product in one country and sell it in another. This provides jobs in one country and less expensive goods in the other. Globalization also allows for the free flow of capital between countries, which many believe spurs economic growth. Proponents of globalization argue that it allows developing countries to continue and hasten their levels of development, and that it protects consumers in developed countries. Opponents believe that globalization serves the interests of multinational corporations at the expense of small businesses, which sends jobs to other countries needlessly.

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve; and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES to grow to service global markets. See INTERNATIONALIZATION.

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve, and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES to grow to service global markets.
References in periodicals archive ?
The globalists are ideologically neither progressive (in that they do not embrace restrictions on capital or regulations aimed at supporting local control) nor are they conservative (in that they have little interest in Christian values and may very well be extremely open-minded in terms of who they invite to their mansions in terms of race, ethnicity or sexuality).
None of this is to say that the more locally-focused groups pose no long-term globalist threat.
Yet, over a hundred interviews--many with globalist and localist policy-makers; some with Bank and Fund officials--were conducted in the Philippines from November 1980 to June 1981, and from July to August 1982.
Understandably, in the decades that followed the terrible human loss of two world wars, most honest men and women readily bought into this, but the reality would almost certainly result in modern slavery while the greedy globalists plundered at will.
New York Times foreign affairs columnist Thomas Friedman, cautioning business leaders who disagree with the critics, observed in a panel discussion that protesters were highly effective in promoting their message in a way that was "far more innovative and entrepreneurial" than the globalists themselves.
The first of these communities is what could be loosely referred to as the Australian segment of a globalist community in the process of being born.
The idea that technology drives globalization omits the point that most of the new technologies emerged before the current globalist phase and are compatible with expanding domestic production and popular consumption.
And it was for the same reason: The Birch Society posed a serious threat to the establishment's globalist agenda.
International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Christine Lagarde again threatened that the controversial globalist institution she runs could move its headquarters from Washington, D.
If Steve Forbes manages to sway the voters with his anemic talk on issues, and his multimillion-dollar media blitz to arrive at the White House, then California would be condemned to his globalist idea of open borders.
Although our Global Citizen product is relatively new to the expat market, it has been very well received by the globalist community," said Angelo Masciantonio, CEO of HTH Worldwide, USA.
The enemy, then, is us--or at least the globalist swamp pretending to speak for us.