globalization

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Globalization

Tendency toward a worldwide investment environment, and the integration of national capital markets

Globalization

The integration of global markets by the reduction trade barriers, improved communication, foreign direct investment, and other means. Globalization allows a multinational corporation to make a product in one country and sell it in another. This provides jobs in one country and less expensive goods in the other. Globalization also allows for the free flow of capital between countries, which many believe spurs economic growth. Proponents of globalization argue that it allows developing countries to continue and hasten their levels of development, and that it protects consumers in developed countries. Opponents believe that globalization serves the interests of multinational corporations at the expense of small businesses, which sends jobs to other countries needlessly.

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve; and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES to grow to service global markets. See INTERNATIONALIZATION.

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve, and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES to grow to service global markets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Them offers a brief, breezy survey chock-full of anecdotes and on-point examples that highlight the worldwide backlash against globalism. There are no caveats.
Potentially, globalism is dangerously wrong because it leads to ill-advised behaviors associated with imperial overreach as warned against by Paul Kennedy's The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers (Random House, 1987) back in the Cold War.
William Marling (2000) argues that the term globalism should be used to discuss the broader context of globalization typified by the transnational flows of capital that intensified after WWII.
He explained that for Trump, the "swamp is a globalism, liberalism, the rule of transnational corporations, aggressive foreign policy." It is "the global network of corruption, liberalism, sectarian ideologies of LGBT, civil society and human rights." Dugin subsumes all of these under the umbrella of the global corruption and perversion, or "globalism," that he opposes, and sees Trump doing the same.
Art institutions, responding to isolationist politics, embrace globalism and global consciousness by seeking to add diverse contemporary global art to collections
To his credit Husain does not argue that "the assumptions about lands and peoples bound up in regionalism and globalism always determined policies or shaped outcomes" (262) and indeed many other factors of culture and geopolitics drove the history of the early Cold War and decolonization.
An imperial and restless ideology, globalism is a potential force for belligerence as well as cosmopolitanism." (216)
The author has studied Al-Qaeda's global terror network, military tensions in the Taiwan Strait, drones and cyberwar, and maintains that Globalism is wildly overstated.
The goal of the Festival is to familiarize population of Bishkek with diversity of cultures, to expand mutual understanding and tolerance, to promote ideas of globalism and unity.
He added that the liberal ideology of globalism clearly wants to oppose Christianity with football.
A passage to globalism; globalization, identities and South Asian diasporic fiction in Britain.
As one of the most potent forces in contemporary scholarship, globalism is a literary topic and an analytic tool that forces a reconsideration and a redefinition of the major categories of human organization, such as nation, state, citizenship, race, gender, class, and community.