globalization

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Globalization

Tendency toward a worldwide investment environment, and the integration of national capital markets
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Globalization

The integration of global markets by the reduction trade barriers, improved communication, foreign direct investment, and other means. Globalization allows a multinational corporation to make a product in one country and sell it in another. This provides jobs in one country and less expensive goods in the other. Globalization also allows for the free flow of capital between countries, which many believe spurs economic growth. Proponents of globalization argue that it allows developing countries to continue and hasten their levels of development, and that it protects consumers in developed countries. Opponents believe that globalization serves the interests of multinational corporations at the expense of small businesses, which sends jobs to other countries needlessly.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve; and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES to grow to service global markets. See INTERNATIONALIZATION.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve, and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES to grow to service global markets.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
We can view this as a distinct phase; call it Globalisation 2.0., a post-World War II phase where trade in goods was combined with complementary domestic policies that helped share the pains and gains of globalisation (and automation).
However, near 1820, the "first wave of globalisation" came into the picture, followed by the second wave, which continues until this very day.
* globalisation means needing to answer emails in the middle of the night to hit deadlines across multiple time zones.
(23) Philip Stephens, "Leaders Sink or Swim with the Irresistible Tide of Globalisation," Financial Times, September 30, 2005, p.
The study revealed that while close to 90 per cent of study participants viewed globalisation as an inevitable but positive business challenge, IT--related respondents were 14% less likely to indicate that their organisations favoured globalisation, and 17 per cent less likely to see it having an overall positive effect on their company.
In the first chapter, Stiglitz lists five concerns that globalisation's critics raise.
He said: "The problem is that it is the very essence of globalisation - free movement of goods and services, free movement of capital and free movement of labour - that is under simultaneous three fold attack by protectionism, this economic patriotism and ris-ing anti-immigrant sentiment.
When globalisation is considered as the spread of cross-border exchanges, it is synonymous to internationalisation.
Part III includes only one chapter contributed by Buse, Drager, Fustukian and Lee, and is titled "Globalisation and health policy: trends and opportunities," which draws on a number of meaningful comparisons, implications and conclusions.
Back to the future: Jeffrey Williamson on globalisation in history.
Key findings of this survey include: over three in every four EU citizens have heard of globalisation and awareness levels are highest in Austria (90%), Finland (89%) with Greece and Italy (88%) third equal.