flexitime

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flexitime

a method of organizing hours of work which permits some flexibility in the times of starting and finishing each working day. Usually the employee will be required to commence work within certain times (for example between 7.00 and 9.30 a.m.) and to remain at work until a specified time (for example 3.30 p.m.). Within these limits employees can choose day by day their hours of work. However, they will usually be required to work a specified total number of hours over a period of, say, one month. Any shortfalls at the end of the period may be carried forward or result in pay deductions whilst excess hours could be dealt with by additional pay or time off in lieu. Flexitime enables employees to adapt their working day to other commitments. However, it also confers advantages to employers: in so far as it requires precise timings to be kept it can tighten control of hours of work; and because potential absences from work (for example, visit to a doctor) can be pushed outside the flexi-day it can improve utilization of staff and productivity. See ANNUAL HOURS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another study of underwater phases (Sanders, 2004) showed that expert swimmers maximize propulsion and minimize resistance notably by adopting a streamlined position and selecting appropriate glide times and underwater propulsion times before commencing free stroking.
The priority meaning for the quality of the turn technique is the optimum extension of duration of wall contact, the push-off time and glide time. In the context of interdependencies between the turn time and the total turn time (r = -0.64), the fact that extending the time-out reduces the total turn time (r = -0.75) explains the need for extending the activities performed from the moment of feet wall contact until finishing the glide in time.
The glide phase is described by three parameters: glide time, glide distance and glide angle (Figure 4).
With the remaining 26 pairs, we found a statistically significant difference between the prop-stopped and prop-windmill-ing glide times. Assuming that the true mean difference is really zero (playing devil's advocate in the statistics world) we found the probability of witnessing a difference as large as we did due to chance alone would be less than 0.0000052.
(2005; 2007), the effective propulsion times of the elite groups were longer and their effective glide times shorter than non-elite swimmers.