GUM

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Related to gingiva: attached gingiva

GUM

GOST 7.67 Latin three-letter geocode for Guam. The code is used for transactions to and from Guamanian bank accounts and for international shipping to Guam. As with all GOST 7.67 codes, it is used primarily in Cyrillic alphabets.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Idiopathic fibrous enlargement of gingiva may be congenital or hereditary.
Occurrence and localization in the attached gingiva. Arch Dermatol.1977; 113:1533- 8.
The present study aims to investigate the relationship of gingival thickness, which is considered to be a significant risk factor for periodontal problems that may be observed in the maxillary anterior region due to orthodontic tooth movements, and width of keratinized gingiva with different malocclusion groups and amount of crowding.
Caption: Figure 15: New waxing of the crowns and gingiva. Source: Dental Design Laboratory.
The metastasis of HCC to gingiva usually relates to extensive tumor spreading and occurs relatively late.
The null hypothesis of this study was that restoration materials have no effect on the color difference between the implant crowns and natural teeth and between the marginal peri-implant mucosa and natural gingiva.
In this study, we investigated the effect of two HDPs, LL-37 and Hst1, on the inflammatory and antimicrobial response by skin and oral mucosa (gingiva) cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts).
Therefore, our data suggest that being a young or middle-aged participant as defined in this study does not affect the levels of GCF LL-37 levels in healthy, as well as inflammatory conditions of gingiva. However, in the present study, we hypothesized that age might be a factor affecting GCF LL-37 levels because of the disregulation of immune response in older people.
Gingivitis is defined as inflammation of the gingiva that most commonly occurs in response to compounds produced by bacteria that reside in a film (called the biofilm) that surrounds the teeth.
Even so, the logistics around getting fresh tissue to the laboratory, the short viability of the tissue ex vivo (48 h) and the extremely limited size of oral mucosa (gingiva) biopsies, which are also often infected with microorganisms, provide profound limitations to implementing these tissues directly as a research tool.
The first signs of gingiva are halitosis and gums will appear red, inflamed and painful to touch.