Gill

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Gill

An obsolete Scottish unit of liquid volume approximately equivalent to 0.053 liters.
References in periodicals archive ?
Department of Transportations Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has declared Ontario, Canada-licensed truck driver Inderjit Singh Gill to be an imminent hazard to public safety, prohibiting him from operating any commercial motor vehicle in the United States.
One of the new products Gills has invested in is a state-of-the-art Florigo frying range at a cost of approximately PS50,000.
The parasitic copepods of the genus Salmincola, often referred to as gill lice, have recently drawn increased attention from managers at Colorado Parks and Wildlife because of their association with economically important fishes.
The gill rakers are cartilaginous or bony structures that project to the inside of the pharyngeal cavity and whose structure changes according to the feeding habit of the fish.
Some vendors at the fish market here are applying a red coloured substance onto the gills of the fish for it to look fresh.
Reginald Gill, 77, conned women into believing they had cancer and told one victim her condition could be cured if a man sucked her breasts for 30 minutes a day.
Reginald Gill, 77, shocked victims by falsely diagnosing cancer using a bizarre electrical probe.
Gill's Cruise Centre, based in Rhiwbina, Cardiff, has been selling holidays for more than 50 years and is one of the UK's leading independent cruise holiday firms.
Principal investigator Clarice Fu, a zoologist from the University of British Columbia in Canada, and her colleagues based their observation on the development of gills in rainbow trout larvae and measured the uptake of ions, which are charged chemical particles, such as sodium.
Further reflection of the IDs resulted in left and right V-shaped gills, capable of oralward particle transport, both on the ventral and dorsal ciliated tracts, as observed by Stasek (1962).
Anthony Gill, 33, from Middleton, and Bradley Gill, 28, from Blackpool, were the leaders of an organised crime group which supplied the Fylde coast.