Billion

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Billion

1. One thousand million in the short scale numbering system.

2. One million million in the long scale number system. This number is known, perhaps more commonly, as one trillion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gillion writes in relation to the Thakurs and the Brahmins: 'These high-castes were not supposed to work on the land with their own hands' (1958:99).
The 200 items of art nouveau furniture, sculpture, ceramics, glass and silverware, as well as paintings, amassed between 1960 and 1990 by Anne-Marie and Roland Gillion Crower, occupy the whole of the bottom floor of the museum.
DEREK WILSON BORN IN SCOTLAND CHARLES CONNOR SCOTS PARENTS CHARLES GILLION MARRIED TO SCOT JOHN NOAKES MARRIED TO SCOT ALEX ROBERTSON BORN IN SCOTLAND
We're in the money: Chris Smith, with cheque, and, front from left, John Noakes, Charlie Gillion, Stephen Derrick, Derek Wilson, Dave Mead, Ally Spence and Neil Tayton.
Gillion (1977) Structure of the New Zealand Economy.
Gillion, C., 2000, The Development and Reform of Social Security Pensions: The Approach of the International Labour Office, International Social Security Review, 1(53), 35-62.
Orszag and Stiglitz, both American economists, argue that the objectives of pension reform could also be achieved with a funded pillar that is publicly managed and that the plan could be a defined benefit plan, a view also held by the International Labour Organization (Gillion et al., 2000).
Member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development--which includes developed nations in North America and Europe as well as Japan--already are spending 10% of their gross domestic products on retirement benefits, said Colin Gillion, head of the International Labor Organization's social security department.
Choosing between the output measure and the traditional average of the three measures of GDP, recommended by Godley and Gillion (1964), Smith, Weale and Satchell (1995) support the drift of the ONS' approach.
Police officer Frank Gillion spotted an escaped bank robber among his fellow runners at a marathon in Calgary, Canada.
These differences are evident when comparing business activities in developed countries to those in developing countries and when examining issues of worker health, safety and environmental issues (Amante, 1993; Cichon and Gillion, 1993).