Guild

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Guild

An association of persons with a particular skill or trade. For example, the electricians in an area may form a guild for mutual support, to route business to each other, or for other reasons. A guild contrasts with a union primarily because it includes both employers and employees; it is based on trade, rather than class. Guilds were most common in medieval Europe, but still exist and have a great deal of sway in some industries, notably filmmaking. Bar associations of lawyers and realtor groups may also be considered guilds.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore a Thomas Groves was keeper of the Gild House, or Town Hall as it was called, and its gardens - for which service he lived rent free in two of the Guild's cottages.
To develop this month's list of leading institutions, GILD examined certification results from the past 3 months.
Bangalore is home to the largest number of GILD certified professionals.
Lavenham wills refer to the Alderman, who was the head or president of the gild and to the chaplain, who appears to have held no similar office in the church itself.
The roll gives information about dues collected from members, rents paid and received for properties and amounts paid for food and drink for the annual gild f east.
SELECTIONS: Galway (Going: Good to Soft): 2.30 Dangerousdanmagru; 3.00 Brigade Charge; 3.30 Estival Park; 4.00 Early Fin; 4.30 Gild (nap); 5.00 Quinze; 5.30 Lord of the Lob.
Nesbit was highly sought after as a model by the top brands of the day embodying the Gilded Age with the ascension of fashion photography and setting the standard for female beauty.
Astor Do?: The Essential Guide to the Manners and Mores of the Gilded Age" serves as a guide to manners as well as an insight to Mrs.
And where once again he finds himself locked in a gilded rat cage.
Gilded Age cub reporters walked into the newsroom without the benefit of a college degree in newswork.
The Republic for Which It Stands: The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896, by Richard White.
In compiled and edited by Helen Zoe Veit (Associate Professor of History at Michigan State University), "Food in the American Gilded Age" excerpts from a wide range of Gilded Age sources ranging from period cookbooks, to advice manuals, to dietary studies--revealing the jarring eating and cooking differentials between classes and regions at a time when technology and industrialization were transforming what and how people ate.